Tuesday, June 21, 2005

UK: The Guardian to stay focused on the news, not the "views"

Despite its upcoming format change (see previous posting), Alan Rusbridger, editor-in-chief of The Guardian, insists that his daily will remain a newspaper, shirking the label "viewspaper" coined by his rival Simon Kelner of the Independent. At first stubborn to alter its appearance, the Guardian has given in to the compact wars and decided to launch a Berliner format in the fall, earlier than expected. Kelner and co. have stolen readers from the Guardian after switching to a tabloid format and pushing their product as focusing on the "views," a strategy that Kelner boasts has been the core of their circulation success. The Guardian is hoping that its smaller appearance at the newsstand (the Berliner format is two-thirds the size of a broadsheet but folded in half on the rack) will appeal more to the public than the tabloid-style Independent. And the Guardian's decision will not be the last British daily morphing. The Telegraph's editor, Martin Newland is said to be seriously considering a revamp of his paper to tabloid format.

Source: The Independent

Posted by john burke on June 21, 2005 at 02:09 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, June 15, 2005

Diversifying a newspaper's products for profit

Rising advertising sales despite dwindling circulations has been a common occurrence in the newspaper business as of late. Last week, Paul O'Halloran, general advertising manager of the UK's Manchester Evening News (MEN), outlined his company's approach to making this seemingly backwards trend work. Poynter tells the story of how MEN diversified its product, ultimately gaining sales and advertiser satisfaction. Since November, the paper has split into morning, midday, and evening editions accompanied by a free morning paper, magazine style inserts, and an afternoon commuter focused version. On top of that, the paper's website and deals with TV and radio have made MEN's product attractive to advertisers, the very advertisers that will keep the paper afloat as O'Halloran essentially predicted the end of paid circulations: "There will be (fewer and fewer) people buying the newspapers and there won't be a revenue model there. We have to give the newspaper away for free."

Source: Poynter

Posted by john burke on June 15, 2005 at 05:51 AM in c. Converged or diverged? The multiplatform newsroom, e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, f. Weekly supplements, q. Global/Local trends, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Thursday, May 19, 2005

India: the Mumbai newspaper market heating up

Mumbai's English-language newspaper market is about to undergo a radical transformation, according to Agencyfaqs. Three English-language papers, the new DNA (Daily News & Analysis) a tabloid from The Times of India, and the Hindustan Times, are invading the city, spreading awareness of their coming launches with advertising campaigns. The Hindustan Times distinguishes itself as a paper of quality news compared to others, which it says focus more on entertainment, declaring "Let there be light." The Times of India, which is launching a tabloid version, boasts that its news is "100% Mumbai." Arguably the most interesting approach comes from the DNA, who is attracting future readers with the slogan "Speak up, it's in your DNA." DNA is passing out surveys around the city that ask potential readers what they would like to have in their daily reading, claiming that it will be a paper created by the readers, even awarding one lucky participant with a vacation.

These new entries are expected to be accompanied by a spike in advertising rates. Already existing papers such as Mid-Day have plans to raise their ad prices now to earn as much revenue as possible before the new dailies are launched. Besides marketing and advertising, Business Standard reports that the Hindustan Times is poised to sell 50,000 copies at a discounted price to mobile communications provider Airtel, who will then distribute the papers to its customers. Bennett, Coleman & Co., publisher of the Times of India and the Economic Times is considering giving its new tabloid for free to readers of the Economic Times. Stay tuned to see which marketing scheme works and which paper struggles in Mumbai.

Sources: Agencyfaqs (here and here) and Business Standard

Posted by john burke on May 19, 2005 at 07:10 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, May 17, 2005

US: free papers catching on

Jon Friedman writes on MarketWatch that New York City commuters are beginning to embrace free papers. When they were first launched, the tabloid sized dailies were mostly found scattered on the subway floor. But as the quality of their news and design has improved, so has their readership. New Yorkers are beginning to question their daily stop at the newsstand when they can pick up their quick news fix on the go from a vendor outside a subway stop and follow up on their morning briefing at their leisure online at the office. With one New York paper, The Sun, seemingly on the verge of going under and others losing and misquoting circulations, free papers may have more of an effect on America than originally thought. And the next logical step for newspapers could be the switch to tabloid.

Source: MarketWatch

Posted by john burke on May 17, 2005 at 06:01 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, May 11, 2005

Spain: the free paper market becomes more saturated

Another free daily, Dicen, is to be launched in Madrid and Barcelona, according to PeriodistaDigital. Distributing a total of 200,000 copies between the two cities, the 24-page colorful paper claims to be the first Spanish free daily to cover "themes of the heart." It will be distributed using traditional freebie methods, at metro stops, hair stylists and supermarkets. Although the editorial staff has not yet been chosen, the new daily plans to launch in September. With the mediocre results of the title Que!, launched in February and competition from the well established and popular 20 Minutos and Metro, it will be interesting to see just how many free papers one country's market can support.

Source: PeriodistaDigital (in Spanish)

Posted by john burke on May 11, 2005 at 04:15 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Monday, May 09, 2005

Wall Street Journal switch to compact update

Rafat Ali at PaidContent elaborates on the Wall Street Journal's May 8 confirmation about converting its European and Asian editions to compact. Dow Jones projects the Journal's savings at USD 17 million from 2006 but costs in 2005 for the planned October 17th switch will be more than the amount saved. One major feature of the new format is closer integration with the financial daily's website. A page in the printed journal will alert readers to articles that were published online between print editions and the two versions of the Journal will supposedly be marketed together.

A couple of questions to keep in mind:

- Most changes in format are inherently followed by changes in format. How is the Journal going to avoid this seeing as it is one of the most trusted sources for financial news on the planet?

- If this switch recaptures lagging sales outside of the States and its successful website takes more and more readers from the print edition, will we see the American version of the Journal follow in its foreign relatives' footsteps?

Source: PaidContent

Posted by john burke on May 9, 2005 at 09:03 AM in c. Converged or diverged? The multiplatform newsroom, e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement, q. Global/Local trends, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Sunday, May 08, 2005

A major shift for the Wall Street Journal in October 2005

From the International Herald Tribune: "The Wall Street Journal is reviewing options for its money-losing European and Asian editions, several people close to the newspaper's operations said on Friday, adding that the most likely change was a shift from broadsheet to tabloid format. By moving to a smaller-sized paper for its two international editions, The Journal would follow a number of other newspapers that have recently turned to the format to cut costs and check circulation declines. But several people close to the newspaper said that an announcement could come as soon as Monday, with the actual shift in the size of the paper occurring later." On Sunday 8 May, the Wall Street Journal confirmed the shift scheduled for 17 October 2005.

Source: International Herald Tribune through Visual Editors

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on May 8, 2005 at 03:20 PM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, n. New sources for Editors | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Friday, May 06, 2005

Jordan: Western style tabloid launched

"We are the first tabloid-size daily similar to those published abroad," said Awni Da'ud, chief editor of the new Jordanian tabloid Al-Anbat. The independent political compact will employ a staff of 100 including journalists with varying political views and claims to combine the "credibility of dailies with the boldness of the weeklies." The staff hopes that its financial and editorial independence will allow the paper to take more daring political positions in a country already known for a sarcastic and critical press. Al-Anbat will be the sixth Arab-language daily in the country.

Source: Jordan Times

Posted by john burke on May 6, 2005 at 07:57 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, o. Ethics and Press Freedom, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Norway: dailies to switch to tabloid format

Following in the footsteps of Aftenposten, four Norwegian dailies, Adresseavise, Bergens Tidende, Stavanger Aftenblad, and Faedrelandsvennen, have appointed a joint committee to discuss changing to tabloid format. All papers are exhibiting much enthusiasm for the trend which has been sweeping Europe for a year and a half and which is becoming popular the world over.

Source: NRK, Oslo (in Norwegian)

Posted by john burke on May 6, 2005 at 07:34 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Monday, May 02, 2005

More threats to the commuter newspaper market

To put it simply, it's getting harder and harder for publishers to sell newspapers to rush hour commuters. Despite its official status as a paid-daily, about 65,000 out of 80,000 copies of Chicago's tabloid style Red Eye are handed out for free at subway stations, reports Chicago Reader. Giving the youth-focused paper away yields higher circulation which in turn allows it to charge more for advertising. Newspapers and their distributers are feeling the crunch. Some kiosks, used to selling 500 papers a day, have seen their sales plummet to 100 copies. In trying to regain their sales, Windy City vendors have implemented promotions such as seducing readers to buy a major daily and turn in their Red Eye in exchange for a free cup of coffee.

We may also be witnessing the end of taxi commuter newspaper readers according to Telematics Journal. Cab companies in London, New York, Australia, and China have been installing high resolution, flat screen televisions for their passengers that play major news and entertainment channels. After being forced to watch a number of advertisements, former newspaper readers are free to browse television stations with the control pads on either side of the taxi. Advertisers such as Virgin Atlantic and Nokia have already jumped on the taxi TV bandwagon taking more business from newspapers.

Sources: Chicago Reader, Telematics Journal

Posted by john burke on May 2, 2005 at 02:18 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Friday, April 29, 2005

Spain: 20 Minutos sells 20% to Grupo Zeta

Valued at euro 70m, the free daily 20 Minutos gave over 20% of its business to Grupo Zeta for euro 15m, in an attempt by the media group to revive its newspaper division. 20 Minutos holds the biggest share of Spain's free paper market with over 2 million daily readers and has surpassed El Pais as Madrid's most read paper.

Source: Periodistas 21 (in Spanish)

Posted by john burke on April 29, 2005 at 07:07 AM in b. Alliances and partnerships: consequences for newsrooms, e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Thursday, April 28, 2005

Advice on the tabloid trend from the experts

Garcia Media, an information design firm, has recently published a report about compact conversions that is sure to be the go-to document for all papers considering the switch. The 23-page PDF includes a detailed history of conversions worldwide, a summary of free papers, reasons for transforming your paper, and advice on how to do so. Mario Garcia and Co. have worked with 16 broadsheets around the world who decided to shrink in size to appeal to the changing habits of their readers. Read the report at Garcia Media (top right hand corner of page).

Source: Poynter

Posted by john burke on April 28, 2005 at 07:23 AM in d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, g. Visual strategies and photojournalism, h. New readers: how to involve them, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, April 27, 2005

US: niche products and Intenet save newspaper advertising

Found on Editor & Publisher, Merrill Lynch has released not so stellar results for the US newspaper industry's first-quarter advertising revenues. Predicted to rise 3.3%, ad income fell short by .3%. The printed press grew about 1.5% but Merrill Lynch said that much of this growth came from new products such as Hispanic publications and weekly papers. Web advertising exploded, increasing 40% "(saving) the quarter." The report emphasized the switch to online advertising with Google and Yahoo's incredible first quarter ad revenue growth (109 and 47% respectively), and a report by a major auto manufacturer who said that they are dedicating 25% of their ad budget to the Web.

Source: Editor & Publisher

Posted by john burke on April 27, 2005 at 07:07 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, f. Weekly supplements, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, April 26, 2005

Metro keeps rolling along

On Gaceta de Prensa: Distributing almost 7 million copies a day after recent expansions, Metro continues to drive the free paper craze and is becoming significantly more profitable. Having launched 11 new editions in 5 countries over the last trimester, Metro International saw its sales jump 28% on the same period last year. It's profits jumped to almost Euro 6 million from well under 400,000 last year. Six of its sixteen national divisions declared profits. As it's local papers continue to expand and it branches out into other ventures (see previous posting), it will surely not deviate from the successful trail it is blazing.

Source: Gaceta de Prensa (in Spanish)

Posted by john burke on April 26, 2005 at 04:13 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement, q. Global/Local trends, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Tuesday, April 19, 2005

Europe: the tabloid trend trumps all

"With the generalization of the tabloid format, some feel we are undergoing a graphic homogeny of newspapers. This is false. When you put all these papers side by side, you can see that their templates are almost infinite," commented German newspaper designer Norbert Kupper in Belgium's La Libre. The consensus at the Sixth European Newspaper Congress, held last week in Vienna, Austria was one of compact praise. In attracting young readers and curbing circulation declines, the more than 300 editors-in-chief that gathered for the conference realized that compact formats were creating success stories all over the continent. Specific examples included Holland's Het Parool, whose reformed business model seeks to attract young readers made it the only Dutch daily to gain readers, and Germany's Die Welt whose launch of a reduced-price compact bucked industry trends in adding readers. Other schemes to attract readers including the development of "services" such as music and dating, and the addition of various topic-specific supplements. But the switch to compact, most notably felt by design departments and artistic directors who have become increasingly important to Europe's innovative papers, certainly won the congress' blue ribbon.

Source: La Libre

Posted by john burke on April 19, 2005 at 06:16 AM in d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Spain: first opinionated freebie launched

Madrid witnessed the launching of its first free ideological evening paper, Ahora, on Monday, according to Juan Varela at Periodistas 21. Opinionated columns are not the norm in Spain's booming free paper market and Ahora will attempt to fill this niche with right-leaning editorial, echoing the sentiments of a population unsatisfied with its left-wing government. 200,000 copies were distributed in restaurants, universities, secondary schools, upscale hotels and office buildings for the new daily's inauguration.

Source: Periodistas 21

Posted by john burke on April 19, 2005 at 02:04 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Monday, April 18, 2005

UK: thoughts on The Independent's dramatic break from sections

Recent editorials in The Independent and the Guardian reflect on the future prospects for the Independent’s bold redesign into a single section. In early April the Independent officially launched its practically single-section compact, taking on many risks and increasing pressure on the compact-defiant Guardian. Merely 18 months after its first launch of a compact format, the Independent decided to undergo yet another dramatic redesign by reducing its size.
It is not of course revolutionary for a tabloid to have one section. However, for a paper of 100 or so pages covering the normal sections of national and international news, opinion, business, sports, features, and classifieds, this is a bold move.

Peter Preston’s editorial in the Guardian shed a bit of criticism concerning the Independent’s recent redesigns. The Independent has stayed true to editor Simon Kelner’s strategy to focus on a single shock story on the front page. Yet the front page now closely resembles a Spanish standard design, with colourful news cross references and trailers often drowning out the chosen shock article. Though the Independent is generally well organized, according to the Guardian’s Preston, it's time to concentrate on “opportunities missed rather than chances seized."

But what will the Guardian’s answer be to the dramatic changes of the Independent and increasing popularity of the compact craze? The Guardian underwent its last controversial redesign 20 year ago, and The Independent’s editorial by Peter Cole says its design “looks neither tired nor old-fashioned.” Yet the Guardian is trying to establish its own path in the trends, with a slightly larger than tabloid format expected to surface early next year. As Cole writes, in the coming months it will certainly be interesting to see the "Guardian's take on the (tabloid) theme."

Source: The Independent and the Guardian

Posted by Andrea Steinberg on April 18, 2005 at 10:24 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Thursday, April 14, 2005

Sweden: Metro wave ready to be surfed... for classifieds?

Having swept its free daily through 17 countries and boasting over 15 million daily readers, the surf of the Swedish based Metro is bubbling once again, expanding its operations with this week's launch of an online classified site, according to Revolution Magazine. With already 900,000 classifieds ads for its Swedish site, the first to be launched, Pelle Tornberg, CEO of Metro International plans on globally expanding these services saying, "Online advertising and online services are some of the fastest growing media segments... the current size, growth and profitability of online make this the perfect time (to launch)." Next on the list of what could be the perfect wave; Finland, Denmark, and the Netherlands. The classified sites are to fall under the banner, Metro Market, and will soon be complimented by Metro Modern Media, a division that will provide services such as dating and music.

Source: Revolution Magazine

Posted by john burke on April 14, 2005 at 04:07 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, n. New sources for Editors, q. Global/Local trends, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

UK: London's new weekly freebie to attract Internet generation

The Guardian writes up London's latest attempt to keep commuters informed. London Line will be be a 24-page weekly that will cover local politics, culture and business comparable to New York's Village Voice and will attempt to fill the evening market. Editor Joy Lo Dico feels that this is a niche market; "There are 8 million Londoners and only 350,000 read an evening paper." With seven pages of news, it is aimed at the 25-35 year-old who tend to get their news from the Internet. Although the paper will be free, readers will be asked to donate 1p in a box placed at the paper's distribution points.

Source: The Guardian

Posted by john burke on April 14, 2005 at 03:46 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Rupert Murdoch insists on newspaper website development

"I'm a digital immigrant. I wasn't weaned on the web, nor coddled on a computer...My two young daughters, on the other hand, will be digital natives. They'll never know a world without ubiquitous broadband internet access." Speaking at the American Society of Newspaper Editors, media baron Rupert Murdoch pushed delegates to get over their fears of the Internet and invest in their digital wings. Since Murdoch has been in the business quite a while and been, shall we say, successful, his words should not be taken lightly. Here are some of the major points of his speech.

Young people's changing habits of news consumption: Taking his cue from Merrill Brown's recent essay, Mr. Murdoch said that youth "have a different set of expectations about the kind of news they will get, including when and how they will get it, where they will get it from, and who they will get it from." Elaborating on this statement, he gave statistics demonstrating younger generations exodus from newspapers and rapid immigration to the Internet. With the expansion of broadband, Murdoch predicts this shift to the Internet to proliferate.

Involve the reader: "Too often, the question we ask is "Do we have the story?" rather than "Does anyone want the story." Murdoch feels that editors and reporters are out of touch with their readers and that the Web provides innovative tools to include them in the news process that should be taken advantage of, notably blogs and now podcasting. This can work for print as well, as Murdoch points out in one of his paper's, The Times of London, switch to compact and elimination of its broadsheet after very positive reader response to the compact.

Advertising online: "The threat of losing print advertising dollars to online media is very real." Quoting Bill Gates, Murdoch said that in five years, the Internet will attract USD 30 billion in advertising revenue. That's equals the current advertising revenue currently collected by the entire newspaper industry. The most immediate challenge, according to the News Corp CEO, is "transforming (newspapers') offline classified business into online marketplaces."

Optimism (even for print!): "Success in the online world will, I think, beget greater success in the printed medium." "By meeting the challenges I've raised, I'm confident we will not only improve our chances for success in the online world but, as importantly, improve our actual printed newspapers."

Source: News Corp

Posted by john burke on April 14, 2005 at 03:13 AM in a. Is blogging journalism?, c. Converged or diverged? The multiplatform newsroom, e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, l. Editors conferences, training sessions and awards, n. New sources for Editors, q. Global/Local trends, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack

Tuesday, April 12, 2005

UK: The Independent changes design

Not even a year after going completely compact, The Independent has changed its look again. Independent editor Simon Kelner introduces readers to a new design," which has been given a fresh, modern look." After complaints from readers about the number of pull-out sections, Britain's first quality compact daily will whittle them down to one a day covering a different topic each weekday. Media listings, art pages and general features were also incorporated in an expanded main body of the paper. As the British elections approach, one page a day will be contributed to news about Westminster. Kelner opens the paper up to criticism, calling on its readers to continue sending suggestions. Apparently he was able to appease advertisers, who were a bit peeved by the new design (see posting here).

Source: The Independent

Posted by john burke on April 12, 2005 at 06:57 AM in d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, g. Visual strategies and photojournalism, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Friday, April 08, 2005

Spain: newspaper circulation up from last year

Gaceta de Prensa reports that the organization, Informacion y Control de Publicaciones, which surveys 840 publications and 151 news websites, has concluded that average Spanish daily circulation grew by 20,000 copies distributing over two billion papers. Revenues also increased by 5%. The rise of Spanish free papers caused a division of the organization, Publicaciones Gratuitas Ejemplares Distribuibles, to announce that they are now surveying more than 150 publications plus 25 others that aren't yet members of the organization including the popular free dailies, Metro, 20 Minutos and Que!. The 151 news websites received more than 31 billion page hits from 217 million unique readers.

Source: Gaceta de Prensa

Posted by john burke on April 8, 2005 at 04:36 AM in c. Converged or diverged? The multiplatform newsroom, e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, n. New sources for Editors | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Thursday, April 07, 2005

US: new news Website looks like tabloid

In related news to our last posting, Jeff Jarvis at Buzzmachine describes a new site launched by Gawker called Sploid. In the New York Observer, Gawker publisher Nick Denton, who expects the site to rival the famed Drudge Report, labeled the sites politics as "'anarcho-capitalist,' pitted only against 'all the lazy incumbents who thrive on hypocrisy.'" Jarvis says it looks like a "cheesy German tabloid," better than Drudge, and notably puts the most important headlines first. Is Mr. Denton taking a smart entrepreneurial move throwing the two biggest trends in the newspaper industry, tabloids and Websites, into the same mixer? Or is the new site too much to handle? Keep an eye on Sploid; it could be the next hottest craze.

Sources: Buzzmachine and The New York Observer

Posted by john burke on April 7, 2005 at 01:32 AM in d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results, n. New sources for Editors, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

US: Opposing views on converting to compact

Eyeing the European trend, US papers have been considering shrinking the size of their printed newspapers. One daily, The Jersey Journal, recently went through with the switch, accompanying news by media companies Knight Ridder and Gannett were considering trial downsizes of their national dailies (see former postings). Here are some contradicting views about the possibilities of American tabloids:

Pessimism:

Alan Jacobson, President, Brass Tacks Design: "Tab conversion? Fughedabowdit (forget about it)." Commenting on an article on NewsDesigner.com, Jacobson rejected any belief that tabloids could succeed in the US based mostly on the fact that advertisers, who provide 85% of American newspapers‚ total revenue (whereas Europeans depend on advertisers for 60-70% of revenue), prefer broadsheets. The Jersey Journal's switch, says Jacobson, was simply a "last-ditch effort" to save a plummeting readership. He refers to other attempts at smaller formats in the US such as Chicago's Red Eye, aimed at young commuters, pointing out that Americans won't pay for compacts: "It doesn't bode well for any industry when they need to give their product away."

Javier Errea, director of the Spanish chapter of the Society for News Design: commenting on the same article, Errea says that London's The Independent changed formats because "It had little to lose...it was in a nose dive." Because consultants are all pushing compacts, he asks, "When all the newspapers go to tabloid, what will happen later? Change them back to broadsheet again?"

Optimism:

Robb Montgomery, News Design Editor, Chicago Sun-Times: Montgomery sees the eventual adoption of tabloid in the US, comparing the trend to USA Today's color press upgrades of 20 years ago. He thinks the primary reason that papers and journalists are hesitant is psychological, due to the negative connotation associated with tabloids.

Tony Smithson, production director, The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky: Quoted in an article entitled "Tabloids to broadsheets: drop dead," on Newspapers & Technology, Smithson sees Yankee papers following their European counterparts' lead. "Within five to ten years, broadsheets will be an anachronism. You won't see them much."

Editors Weblog: Why not give it a shot? Seeing as The Jersey Journal's circulation had fallen by 75% before its switch, it does appear that their decision was a "last-ditch effort" to save their title. But with free urban dailies attracting significant commuter readerships in some American cities, it wouldn't hurt for major metropolitan papers to try... if their circulation is declining of course. "If it ain't broke, don't fix it," but when looking to save circulation, tabloids could be the answer American newspapers are looking for.

ps. Investing in newspaper website development and innovation ain't a bad idea either.

Sources: Newspapers & Technology and NewsDesigner

Posted by john burke on April 7, 2005 at 01:17 AM in d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement, q. Global/Local trends, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Friday, March 25, 2005

Aggregators: traffic blessing or copyright curse?

The news industry has mixed opinions about the advantages and disadvantages of aggregators according to the Wall Street Journal Online through Excite. Some editors enjoy the traffic that their site receives when their stories show up high on the list of headlines. Others are perturbed by their lower positions. And in a practice that some in the industry believe will be common place, a few newspapers simply pay for aggregators to give their articles priority, such as the New York Times did with Topix.net. This past week's two aggregator related events, the Topix.net deal and AFP's legal action against Google, whose consequences won't be know for some time highlight the dilemma that editors are facing. AFP demanded that Google remove its content from its GoogleNews site on charges of copyright infringement. Some in the industry scoffed, dismissing AFP to the nut house for canceling the free press and traffic its brand name gets through Google. But this is nothing new as others, notably Yomiuri Shimbun, Japan's largest paper, have also refused Google permission to reprint its material. On the other hand, the Topix.net deal, in which three major newspaper companies - Gannett Co., Knight-Ridder Inc., and Tribune Co., each bought a 25% stake in the high-traffic news consolidator, hints that publishers see aggregators as boosting hits on their own site and spreading their brand recognition. What will be the final verdict?

We can't be sure yet. But we may be able to make a pretty good prediction simply from this posting. My source for this posting is the Wall Street Journal, one of the very few pay-for newspaper websites in the world, a publication which has been documented as being ignored as an online reference strictly because of its pay-model, yet a news site to which I am not a subscriber. So how did I read the article? I'm only assuming I've been able to access sacred WSJ content because the Dow Jones Co., publisher of the WSJ, has a deal with Excite which allows it to let a free article slip out from time to time. Considering this, my guess is that most newspapers will keep themselves open to aggregators, or else risk suffocation at the digital hands of those who do.

Source: The Wall Street Journal Online through Excite.

Posted by john burke on March 25, 2005 at 09:41 AM in b. Alliances and partnerships: consequences for newsrooms, c. Converged or diverged? The multiplatform newsroom, e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, n. New sources for Editors, q. Global/Local trends, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, March 22, 2005

Norway: leading daily's successful switch to compact

On Publicitas: Recently released figures show that Aftenposten, Norway's main daily, gained an average of 10,000 new daily readers in the year from March 2004 to the present, a period which coincides with the paper's switch to a tabloid format. During the same time frame, the paper also gained 10,000 new Saturday readers and 9,000 new Sunday edition readers. The paper's CEO, Olav Mugaas commented on the paper's success saying "We are very satisfied with the fact that our work involving Aftenposten’s changes to compact format as well long-term editorial development have given us such good results." Mugaas also said that the paper's website witnessed substantial growth. On a contrary note, Aftenposten's Evening Edition lost 11,000 readers, showing the growing importance and popularity of the morning compact edition.

Source: Publicitas

Posted by john burke on March 22, 2005 at 02:48 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Monday, March 21, 2005

US: paper with waning readership to switch to compact format

The New York Times reports that The Jersey Journal, in trying to reverse its declining circulation, has decided to make the transformation to a tabloid format, a switch that many papers are considering. One American experiment with compact formats, the free amNewYork, has proven popular with commuters who like the brief news summaries and colorful pages which compliment daily rides public transportation. But in the United States, major corporations' such as Knight Ridder, consideration of compact formats for their major metro area publications have been stymied by concerns of loss of advertising. Advertisers are hesitant about the smaller papers whose advertising spaces will logically be smaller. European dailies have had an easier time switching to tabloid formats because advertising accounts for 60-70% of a paper's revenue, whereas in the United States, newspapers depend on advertisers for 85% of their revenue. Jeff Jarvis, journalism professor, blogger, and consultant for the New Jersey paper is optimistic about American compacts, noting that readers prefer them to broadsheets. Only time will tell if advertisers learn to accept this trend.

Source: New York Times

Posted by john burke on March 21, 2005 at 02:44 AM in d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, g. Visual strategies and photojournalism, h. New readers: how to involve them, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, March 08, 2005

US: tabloid craze to conquer?

Following the success of tabloid versions in other countries, it seems that the Chicago Tribune has been toying with the idea of its own compact paper, reports Crain's Chicago Business. Having already attempted to attract younger readers with RedEye, a venture that attracted advertises but has failed to increase paid circulation, the Tribune could be looking for additional outlets to attract readers. Susan Mango Curtis, a professor at Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism, said, "Generation Y, that's their format. (Newspapers) should all be thinking about going tabloid." The Tribune's management has declined comment about any definite change in format. However, hypothetically, a successful tabloid could spur other papers around the country to consider changing their format, just as the RedEye persuaded The Washington Post and Dallas Morning News to launch their own youth papers.

Source: Crain's Chicago Business through Poynter

Posted by john burke on March 8, 2005 at 06:13 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement, q. Global/Local trends, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Friday, March 04, 2005

UK: The Financial Times to experiment with compact

On Media Guardian: Along with the rest of the newspaper industry, The Financial Times has suffered declining sales but has so far refused to give into the tabloid fad. Until now. After the announcement of the pre-election budget, the famed pink daily will release a free special evening edition in tabloid format at strategic locations outside of underground stations, most likely uniquely in London. FT will print between 70,000 and 100,000 copies and the paper will be no more than 10 pages. As for permanently making the switch, a FT spokeswoman said that the planned evening compact is simply a marketing tool to persuade people to buy the paper the following day, an edition that will contain the "usual detailed comment and analysis."

Source: Media Guardian

Posted by john burke on March 4, 2005 at 04:54 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

UK: The Guardian to go berliner earlier than planned?

MediaWeek reports that London's The Guardian, who have been planning to switch to a Berliner format in spring 2006, may release the mid-sized paper this summer, eight months ahead of schedule. At this point, it seems financially and strategically unfeasible because printing would take place in Europe after which the daily edition would have to be flown to Britain, cutting precious time off the printing of any breaking news. Steve Goodman, press director at MediaCom, is wary of an early launching, saying, "I don't want it to be sprung on us. We need enough time – three to four months, say – to explain all the ramifications and have a dummy to show clients."

Source: MediaWeek

Posted by john burke on March 4, 2005 at 04:38 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, February 15, 2005

Free papers: new distribution methods

Some recently launched free papers provide innovative means of distribution, straying from the original idea of placing them at subway stations in order to attract the morning commuter. Click on the link below for some new ideas.

In London, Standard Lite, The Evening Standard's free spin off launched in December, has replaced the first two editions of it's mother paper and is distributed between 11:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. The freebie, aimed at the 600,000 downtown Londoners that leave their office at lunchtime, is designed to give readers a taste of the evening news to come, so as to increase sales of The Evening Standard. Originally aimed at 50,000 readers, the paper's first circulation figures show that it has surpassed this goal by 5,000, but it is still greatly overshadowed by Metro, which has a circulation of more than a million.

Spain's new free paper, Qu?, released last month by the publisher Recoletos has had huge success passing the million mark and distributing more nationwide papers than Metro and 20 Minutos over the month-long period. Apparently somewhat illegaly, Qu? has been distributing its papers in the afternoon as well as near kiosks in trying to best its competitors. Its marketing team has discussed distributing the paper in kiosks with an important kiosk group but so far with negative results, as this group has threatened to stop distributing Marca, a sports paper also owned by Recoletos. Metro, on the other hand, is distributed in 50 kiosks in Barcelona paying 0.018 cents (euro) to the kiosk owner for each copy it distributes. Several Spanish paid papers have tried unsuccessfully to stop this practice, possibly leaving the way open for Qu?'s desired expansion in the future.

Perhaps the most aggressive move in the free paper market is the delivery of Washington D.C.'s new free paper, the Washington Examiner, to wealthy residences as well as its distribution to commuter traffic, resulting in a combined circulation of 260,000. If this venture proves successful, the paper's owner, Philip Anschutz has applied to copyright the papers name in over 70 American cities. Jack Shafer at Slate, however, questions the relevance of a delivered free paper to high income households that can get the same if not better free news on the internet whenever they want.

Sources: MediaGuardian on Standard Lite, PRNoticias on Qu?, Slate and the Washington City Paper on the Washington Examiner

Posted by john burke on February 15, 2005 at 05:41 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results, q. Global/Local trends, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Writing, editing and design: the perfect combination for a successful paper

On Gaceta de Prensa, Mario R. Garcia asks why some papers are more successful than others when implementing a new design, even if these designs happen to be similar. The answer: W.E.D., or Writing, Editing, and Design. When ameliorating the esthetic aspect of a paper, writing and editing must be meticulously integrated. How can a font be decided upon if it is not known what content it will embody? How can the architecture of a page be discussed if it is not known how long the articles to be published on the page will be? Garcia thinks that there should be constant exchange between journalists, editors and visual designers and a lot of creativity. Journalists should make sure that the visual designers understand the idea behind a story and the point of view that the story will take. Editors, when implementing W.E.D. (which they should), need to encourage coordination in the newsroom and not discriminate between the higher importance of reporting or designing. The designer must understand the story before considering the physical presentation, including photos, of the article. By working together in the newsroom, journalists will be more successful in reaching the demands of the reader, who does not, for example, want to see a photo that says the same thing as the headline, who likes to see the face of the people involved in the story, and who likes to know by looking at the design the general gist of the story. Garcia's W.E.D. ideas relate to compacts, free papers, and when attracting younger readers, all efforts that have experienced a change in content and editorial management that accompanied the change in format originally designed to attract readers.

Source: Gaceta de Prensa

Posted by john burke on February 15, 2005 at 01:59 AM in d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, g. Visual strategies and photojournalism, h. New readers: how to involve them, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Thursday, February 10, 2005

Scotland: new weekly to compete in already saturated market

Opinions are mixed about the launching of a new paper in Scotland, according to The Scotsman. Because the Scottish market is already very competitve, between Scottish nationals and Scottish versions of English papers, some say that there is no room for a new paper which will presumably be entitled the Scottish Standard. A former editor of the short-lived Sunday Scot, which began and failed in four months in 1991, thinks that Derek Carstairs, the new weekly's financial backer, is crazy; "He must have money to burn. Why would anyone want to do a new newspaper in Scotland when everyone is witnessing declining sales. I’d like to see his market research. It would make for interesting reading." Alex MacLeod, the new paper's launch editor, on the other hand, sees a niche for the national paper, which is to take a pro-independance stance. The 56-page, tabloid format weekly is to hit the newsstands sometime in the spring.

Source: The Scotsman

Posted by john burke on February 10, 2005 at 04:37 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, k. Newspapers launches and results, n. New sources for Editors, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, February 09, 2005

Spain: 20 Minutos relaunches its webpage

The ongoing Spanish free paper war has moved online, according to PRNoticias. In a move to differentiate itself from its printed edition, 20 Minutos has added new sections, more photos, an optimized archive, more services, and an overall increase in breaking news to its website. The site will also include PDF versions of all of its printed pages and options for reader commentary. The papers director, Arsenio Escolar, says that the idea behind the new website is to put the paper in direct contact with readers, "so that they become 20 Minutos' neighborhood correspondents."

Source: PRNoticias

Posted by john burke on February 9, 2005 at 04:45 AM in d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, g. Visual strategies and photojournalism, h. New readers: how to involve them, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement, q. Global/Local trends, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Switzerland: a case study of Blick's change in format

Gaceta de Prensa has posted an article summarizing last year's change in format of Switzerland's Blick. When the daily originally sold its compact version alongside its broadsheet at newstands last May, 75% of readers chose the tabloid. After seven weeks of success, the paper decided to change its format permanently. Below are the observations of the staff and some useful information for switching to tabloid.

Source: Gaceta de Prensa

The succession of events at Blick:

-The change energized the paper's staff

-Commercially, the change was a success, but their was some pressure to reduce advertising prices.

-So, they modified the size of advertising formats...

-...and the price, reducing the price of a full page add by 10% and raising the price of the smaller, modified ads due to their better visibility.

-Then, they guaranteed the prices for 18 months.

Their clients were happy with the changes. Although they reduced the price of the full page, in the following months, they surpassed the revenue gained by the old format.
Originally, circulation was very high during the period that the double format was offered, but eventually evened out, falling to normal levels. There was no real "explosion" of circulation, but declining newstand sales stopped. However, they did have problems with subscriptions, somehthing the Blick staff contributes to demographics. The compact was attracting women and younger readers, and the paper has realized that it needs to change its content to appeal more directly to these groups. Overall, the change has been positive for the paper.

Posted by john burke on February 9, 2005 at 04:25 AM in d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, g. Visual strategies and photojournalism, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results, q. Global/Local trends, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, February 08, 2005

Spain: popular free papers boosting paid paper sales

In an interview with Metro Spain's director, Carlos Oliva-Vélez, on PRNoticias, the country's free paper market is put into context. Oliva-Vélez, emphasizing the crisis that printed newspapers are facing, says that the launching of Metro three years ago in Spain has "strengthened and recuperated" the entire market, even that of traditional paid papers. Because people get the local news from free papers, they don't get the depth that a paid paper offers, and thus have begun to buy more paid papers. The problem, says Vélez, is that the free market is now inundated. Even though each freebie offers something different, ( Metro gives brief informational summaries, 20 Minutos provides more opinion, and Qué focuses on "sensationalism"), Veléz doesn't think that there is room for the three major free papers, but is certain that Metro will not be the one to go under. In fact, Metro Spain plans on doubling its market in the coming year, from 15 cities to 30.

Source: PRNoticias

Posted by john burke on February 8, 2005 at 01:24 AM in d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, g. Visual strategies and photojournalism, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, February 02, 2005

Washington D.C. free paper is launched

Philip Anschutz, newspaper owner and financier, launched the free Washington Examiner in the Washington D.C. area on February 1. The tabloid format paper will be distributed at 1,400 newspaper racks near Metro and bus stations and will be delivered to upper-middle class households targeting 25-54 year olds, expecting a total weekly circulation of 260,000. Anschutz bought Virginia and Maryland suburban papers last year and has incorporated them into local editions of the Examiner which will also be distributed in the two states. The paper will mostly focus on local events, but will include political news (supposedly remaining neutral despite Anschutz's conservative views) and an opinion section called "The American Conversation." It is thought that Anschutz has plans to spread the brand in local editions to 69 cities around the country.

Source: The Denver Post

Posted by john burke on February 2, 2005 at 03:56 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, k. Newspapers launches and results, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Spain: 2 more specialized free papers to be launched

With 20 Minutos, Metro, and Qué enjoying success in Spain's free paper market, specialized gratuitos according to subject are soon to be published. PRNoticias reports that in the wake of the free sports paper, Mediapunta which has recently been launched, two new freebies will hit the streets in April. Ahora will be an evening paper dedicated to politics and 20 Negocios will focus on economics and finance. They will share the common goals of capitalizing on the success of free papers and diversifying their content from the three major free papers which provide general news. PRNoticias thinks that Spain's established paid papers, such as Cinco Dias and Expansion may "suffer the consequences of this 'second revolution of free papers.'"

Source: PRNoticias

Posted by john burke on February 2, 2005 at 03:33 AM in d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Thursday, January 27, 2005

US: Knight Ridder eyes launching tabloid papers

According to Reuters , "Newspaper publisher Knight Ridder Inc. is considering launching free dailies and smaller, tabloid-size editions of its papers to boost readership, Chief Executive Tony Ridder said. A Knight Ridder circulation task force is eyeing both of these industry trends, said Ridder, whose San Jose, California-based company publishes papers including The Miami Herald and the Philadelphia Inquirer. "We think that a tabloid size has a lot of appeal and there's a track record in various places that indicates that really works and can boost circulation. Even though we haven't made a final decision, we will probably be testing that in a few markets" said Ridder."

Source: Reuters through Yahoo

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on January 27, 2005 at 07:31 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, i. What is newsworthy or how to reshape the future of the newspaper, k. Newspapers launches and results | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Monday, January 24, 2005

Canada: new free paper for youth

The Globe and Mail reports that CanWest Global Communications Corp. will be launching a free commuter daily aimed at urban youth. It will start out in March with a circulation of 300,000 in five major Canadian cities and will be accompanied by a website, eventually expanding to news delivery via mobile phones. CanWest, which owns broadsheet papers in many Canadian cities, is thought to be starting the free paper in a move to defend its market, which has seen competition in Toronto from Metro and 24 Hours, and attract the 18 to 34 year-old demographic. The paper is expected to follow standard free format using concise, easy to read stories and lots of entertainment news.

Source: The Globe and Mail

Posted by john burke on January 24, 2005 at 02:23 AM in d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Monday, January 17, 2005

UK: tsunami spurs rise in holiday sales

In an article on The Independent Online Edition, Peter Cole, journalism professor at the University of Sheffield, describes the significant increase in holiday sales due to Asia's tsunami disaster. Normally a downtime for newspapers, the tragedy boosted circulation some 60,000 copies a day during the week between Christmas and the New Year and sales were up 150,000 copies on Sunday, January 2 thanks to public demand and quality reporting. But still, Cole points out that on the whole, newspaper sales are still down. Although The Independent and The Times are both up mostly thanks to their switch to a compact format, the Telegraph fell behind The Times on full price sales and The Mirror, The Sun and The Guardian all suffered. With The Guardian and The Observer soon switching to a Berliner format in hopes of increasing circulation, the British newspaper market will be interesting to survey.

Source: The Independent Online Edition

Posted by Ulrike Trux on January 17, 2005 at 03:52 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, q. Global/Local trends, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

US: new free paper in Washington DC

According to the Kansas City Star, Denver billionaire and founder of Qwest Communications, Philip Anschutz is poised to launch a free paper in the Washington DC area called The Examiner, offering international, national, and local news. Anschutz, who has applied to trademark the name of the paper in 68 cities around the country, plans to begin printing on February 1. In keeping in competition with the well regarded Washington Post and Washington Times, the paper will be focused at "well-educated homeowners between 25 and 49 years of age with household incomes of more than $75,000." Circulation is expected to initially reach 260,000, being delivered to wealthy homes and distributed at news stands.

Source: Kansas City Star

Posted by john burke on January 17, 2005 at 02:09 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results, q. Global/Local trends, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Canada: a colorful new Sunday paper

January 16th marked the debut of the new color, magazine-style broadsheet of the Toronto Star, Canada's leading daily with a weekly circulation of 2.7 million, according to Canada NewsWire. Not only has the papers esthetic been improved, but it also aims to give readers the quality editorial they desire with engaging columns, breaking news, and lots of sports and entertainment. Giles Gherson, editor-in-chief of the Star realized the opportunities that lie in a Sunday paper: "Increasingly people can get the basic news story of the day off the Web or from television or radio, so newspapers must relentlessly deliver more value, particularly on weekends. This Sunday magazine approach does that in spades - more depth, more context, different story angles - and all beautifully presented." Thought to be the first paper in North America with color on every page, Sunday editor Allison Uncles says, " "With features as the focus of the newspaper and colour on every page, it's like a hybrid magazine - truly unique. "We've put a heavy emphasis on great writing, photography and design, so the content will match the elegant look."

Source: Canada NewsWire

Posted by john burke on January 17, 2005 at 01:35 AM in d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, g. Visual strategies and photojournalism, h. New readers: how to involve them, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Friday, January 14, 2005

UK: The Guardian will be full-colour... and more compact

Guardian Newspapers is spending GBP 50 million on new , full colour printing presses with plans to introduce "mid-size" format (Berliner) version of The Guardian and The Observer in 2006, says Media Week. Investments in printing centers in England will also help the papers compete with their rivals' compact editions. Carolyn McCall, chief executive of Guardian Newspapers says, "We will have the most modern presses in the newspaper industry, allowing us to produce better quality, more convenient, full-colour newspapers in an exciting format, never before seen in the UK national newspaper market.

Source: Media Week

Posted by john burke on January 14, 2005 at 01:53 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, January 12, 2005

Trends in Newsrooms 2005: a preview of the 12th World Editors Forum

It will be my second conference at the World Editors Forum and I begin to receive answers from speakers. Here is my introduction to this event to be held in Seoul, South Korea from 29 May to 1 June 2005:

"The newspaper industry in 2003 could be seen as a British year with the launching of compact editions for The Independent and The Times. A smart answer for young readers and commuters and the first real positive action to counterbalance the circulation crisis in mature markets.

By the same measure, 2004 was a German year due to the new initiatives of Axel Springer and Georg von Holzbrinck groups. Welt Kompakt, News and several other new titles now compete with free papers and also attract young readers. What is fascinating in this experience is that media groups have initiated collaborative and exchange processes between different newsrooms.

What will be the symbol of the year 2005? It could emerge at the 12th World Editors Forum to be held in Seoul.

Perhaps 2005 will be an American year. For four reasons:

- we have invited as keynote speaker Dan Gillmor, the well-known blogger and ex-columnist for the San Jose Mercury News, the pioneering Californian newspaper. He will tell us more about his wish to create citizen journalism based on his book We the Media: Grassroots Journalism by the People, for the People. Call it participatory journalism or public journalism or open source journalism, it is a major issue to involve more and more readers in the news gathering and debating process

- RSS (Real Simple Syndications) and news aggregators - as Google News and Google Alerts - are rather unknown outside the US. But editors need to know how it could reshape the way readers are informed. Personalized news is no longer a slogan, it is developing and very few newspapers are ready to this revolution. Google executives will explain their views on this issue, Rich Skrenta, Topix.net CEO too.

- more and more American newspapers are considering charging subscription fees for the online version of their flagship newspaper. As New York Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger Jr said: "It gets to the issue of how comfortable are we training a generation of readers to get quality information for free. That is troubling." Indeed!

- There have also been major innovations in the design of many American newspapers. Mario Garcia from Garcia Media will help us to discover their main innovations."

In other words, the 12th World Editors Forum is very promising with cutting edge information provided to cutting edge editors!

Source: 12th World Editors Forum

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on January 12, 2005 at 03:20 AM in a. Is blogging journalism?, c. Converged or diverged? The multiplatform newsroom, d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, g. Visual strategies and photojournalism, i. What is newsworthy or how to reshape the future of the newspaper, j. Staff changes, l. Editors conferences, training sessions and awards, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement, s. 2004 World Editors Forum in Istanbul, t. 2005 World Editors Forum in Seoul | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Friday, January 07, 2005

"Viewspapers": changing the purpose of journalism

Check out Dan Milmo's article in The Guardian about his editor, Alan Rusbridger, commenting on last year's format and ownership changes and the permanent effects they will have on traditional broadsheet journalism. "If you have got news organisations saying 'we are putting news behind views', this is a fundamental statement about what newspapers are for and what journalism is for ... It is radically new, it is not what serious broadsheet journalism was about." Rusbridger, speaking at a seminar hosted by media buyer OMD UK, said that the successful switch to compact papers at The Indepedent and The Times as well as alternative news sources such as rolling TV news stations have shifted editorial focus and made a reformation of the purpose of journalism 2005's primary newsroom issue. He concludes that journalist's will have to become more accountable for their work in 2005 because of last year's changes. The Independent's editor, Simon Kelner, responded to Rusbridger's comments saying that newspapers have to accept that they are no longer the primary source for breaking news and adapt accordingly. "I don't see why having a variety of comment, in-depth analysis, views - all of those things - is not serious quality journalism," said Kelner.

Source: The Guardian

Posted by john burke on January 7, 2005 at 02:03 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, i. What is newsworthy or how to reshape the future of the newspaper, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement, o. Ethics and Press Freedom | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Monday, January 03, 2005

Axel Springer may launch French tabloid paper... in 2007

According to Reuters, "Axel Springer, publisher of Germany's best-selling daily Bild, plans to launch new tabloid newspapers in countries that could include France in a few years, its chief executive was quoted as saying on Monday. Springer, which started Polish daily Fakt last year and made it the country's best-selling paper within months, sees opportunities for tabloids in both eastern and western Europe, Mathias Doepfner told Sueddeutsche Zeitung in an interview. "I see an enormous potential in eastern and western Europe," Doepfner said. "We are looking at several countries and will make a decision in 2006 at the earliest." Europe's largest newspaper publisher, which has launched 24 new newspapers and magazines in countries including Hungary, Lithuania or Poland along with Germany, will spend the next two years consolidating those new projects, he said.

Source: Reuters through Metro Canada

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on January 3, 2005 at 04:51 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, k. Newspapers launches and results | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Thursday, December 09, 2004

How German compacts differ from British tabloids

The Guardian features a commentary on recent developments of tabloid editions of German newspapers and their differences to British tabloids. The Guardian explains on behalf of the development of several tabloids in Germany: "these tabloids have not got anything to do with the Sun's kind of journalism. Nor are they a copy of the broadsheets in a smaller size." Rather, explains the article, is the tabloid-format in Germany equivalent to compact editions of the traditional newspapers, cut-off times for editions until after midnight, and a new target groups.

Currently there are three forms of tabloids in Germany. The first is the concept pursued by Axel Springer Verlag: "We want to reach new readers with Welt Kompakt," says Jan-Eric Peters, the editor of Welt, Welt Kompakt and Bild, who developed the tabloid for Axel Springer. "More than half of the readers of Welt Kompakt have not read a newspaper before, and more than half are aged between 18 and 35. It is an additional product to Welt". Peters will not comment on the exact circulation, but insiders estimate it sells between 10,000 and 20,000 copies a day. "However, to replace the broadsheet Welt with Welt Kompakt, like the Independent and the Times in the UK have done, is out of the question, he said to the Guardian. "Except for the format, we have not much in common with the British model." A second model has been applied by Holtzbrinck. "In the east German region of Lausitz, for example, 20 Cent, the tabloid version of the daily, Lausitzer Rundschau, is aimed at those readers who can't or won't spend more than ?0.20 on a newspaper." The third tabloid concept is a fusion concept of news and cultural agendas for separate towns, such as Boulevard W?rzburg.
Here are some comments of media specialists:
"The publishers finally adapt to the multimedia age," says Jo Groebel, head of the European Institute for the Media in D?sseldorf. Horst Roeper, director of the media thinktank Formatt-Institut in Dortmund thinks that there are more tabloids to come in Germany. "All the big publishers have concepts in their drawers," he says. A development like the British market, where several of the big nationals switch completely to a smaller format, is however unlikely, he thinks. "A fundamental transformation like that would be too expensive for the German publishers right now. [...] The new tabloids altogether still sell "well under 100,000 copies", Roeper says.

Source: The Guardian

Posted by Ulrike Trux on December 9, 2004 at 05:14 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, q. Global/Local trends, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, December 08, 2004

Germany: Süddeutsche reveals new projects for 2005

Die Welt features an interview with Süddeutsche CEOs Klaus Josef Lutz and Hanswilli Jenke, in which they discuss promising revenues for 2004 and new projects for 2005. Large revenues, according to Lutz, resulted from supplementary projects of the newspaper, such as the 'SZ Library,' a CD collection, and the launch of the magazine 'SZ Wissen.' For other projects in the 2005, Lutz outlines Süddeutsche's "White Label Strategy," allowing for sub-brands which are not directly linked to the SZ brand, hence transforming Süddeutsche into a broader media company in the near future. Referring to earlier announcements of SZ's editor-in-chief Hans-Werner Kilz, Lutz underlines that after the evaluation of market polls, the publisher has decided against a weekly supplement to their daily newspaper to target young readers and is further moving away from a tabloid edition of their paper. Lutz said: "the polls show a clear tendency: young readers are looking for a magazine, that covers their needs and not a general paper," hence indicating that the format for the targeted young readers will most probably be another magazine.

Source: Die Welt

Posted by Ulrike Trux on December 8, 2004 at 06:17 AM in d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, f. Weekly supplements, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Germany: News reaches its target group

Newsroom reports that Handelsblatt Publishing considers an increased circulation for their tabloid News. According to Harald Müsse, CEO of Handelsblatt Publishing, besides an increased circulation for the existing Frankfurt edition, the publisher contemplates several new editions for other regions of Germany. Müsse explained further: "Two month after the launch, we have daily sales of 5000 copies, and the number of subscriptions is already close to 1000, although the subscription service has only been established recently." Furthermore, a recent study of the research institute IRES proved that News' the target group had been well-established before Handelsblatt launched their tabloid: 62% of News' readers are under 39 years old, and did not read daily newspapers before its launch.

Source: Newsroom

Posted by Ulrike Trux on December 8, 2004 at 05:43 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, December 01, 2004

Danish Information goes tabloid

Der Standard reports that the Danish daily Information has switched to the tabloid format last Tuesday, while at the same time doubling its number of pages per edition. Editor-in-chief Palle Weis explains the move as an attempt to make the paper easier to read and enhance flexibility. Information was launched in the Danish Resistance movement during the second World War and has since maintained a circulation of 20.000 copies on average.

Source: Der Standard

Posted by Ulrike Trux on December 1, 2004 at 06:01 AM in d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, November 30, 2004

Netherlands: National daily Trouw to go compact

According to PCM Uitgevers, "the daily newspaper Trouw will be issued in compact size starting February 3, 2005. Trouw will be the first quality daily newspaper in the Netherlands to move to the tabloid format. A survey has confirmed that readers of the newspaper are enthusiastic about the change.The newspaper will maintain the quality of its editorial content, but it will bring more colour and pictures as well as a better and varied presentation. The articles will be not shorter, but more accessible."

Source: PCM Uitgevers through Publicitas

Posted by Valérie Gazzano on November 30, 2004 at 03:01 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Friday, November 26, 2004

Germany: New products and new readers for the newspaper market

Marc Zeimetz, Manager, Projects and Newspaper Strategy Division and Klaus Madzia, Editor-in-Chief (News), Verlagsgruppe Georg von Holtzbrinck, Germany gave a presentation on the evolution, that the German newspaper market is currently undertaking at the World Association of Newspapers' 2004 World Editor and Marketeer Conference in Lisbon. Following similar strategies to adapt to the changing German newspaper market Jan-Eric Peters, Editor-in-Chief, Die Welt, Welt Kompakt, Berliner Morgenpost, Germany illuminates his company's approach. Marc Zeimetz and Klaus Madzia presented marketing strategies and target groups for Holzbrinck's new publications 20 Cents and News, underlining that they were not targeting the masses with the new trend but rather presenting more varied news for the ever growing target groups of print media. Jan-Eric Peters added another angle to the discussion by introducing Axel Springer's new paper Welt Kompakt. He related the merging of Berliner Morgenpost's, Die Welt's and Welt Kompakt's editorial offices to the new trend and explained how all papers profit from the resources of their colleagues at the newly merged editorial office.

Traditional German newspapers are too old, too expensive, too big, too slow and too rigid, says Mr Zeimetz, in introducing the strategy that has led to new, youth-oriented newspapers like Von Holtzbrinck's 20 Cent and News. "Having identified these problems, we now have opportunities," he says. "We want to be young, inexpensive, fast, streamlined, practical and convenient, and flexible." The presentations by Mr Zeimetz and Mr Madzia included case studies of the recently launched German newspapers, which are already attracting young readers who never read newspapers on a regular basis before. 20 Cent, named for its cover price, is a young, quick information newspaper with a big entertainment section, targeted at 14- to 39-year olds. It has led to new market expansion--other newspapers in its test markets have not suffered circulation declines. And the paper has attracted new advertising. News, which Mr Madzia described as a "newszine", attempts to combine hard news and information with more in-depth magazine-like reporting and increased utility. It also includes interactive elements like SMS options and web links. It sells for 50 euro cents. "We are not talking any more about one product for the masses, but different products for different target groups," says Mr Zeimetz.
Jan-Eric Peters, Editor-in-Chief, Die Welt, Welt Kompakt, Berliner Morgenpost, Germany illuminates his company's adaptations to the changing newspaper industry in Germany. At first glance, Welt Kompakt might seem to be smaller version of the Germany quality broadsheet Die Welt. But it is something completely new, and completely different. "It is not just a new concept for newspapers, it is part of a unique world-wide journalistic model," says Mr Peters. "We've not only increased quality, but we cut costs. Name me a publisher in the world who would not want such a model." The new model began when Axel Springer's quality national Die Welt and its regional sister publication, Berliner Morgenpost, combined their editorial staffs -- going from 300 journalists each to 350 for the two publications. Although the cuts were severe, Die Welt benefits from the regional competencies of Berliner Morgenpost, while the Berlin paper benefits from the national competencies of Die Welt, says Mr Peters. And when Welt Kompakt joined the mix, it benefited from both. "It is similar to a news agency serving several newspapers," says Mr Peters about the combined newsroom. Launched in May 2004 in Berlin and seven other German cities, Welt Kompakt is not a substitute for the broadsheet, but a different offer aimed at new readers, particularly younger readers who don't have a lot of time but want quality journalism. The tabloid sells for 50 euro cents. The majority of readers are between 18 and 35 years old and have not read newspapers before on a regular basis, says Mr Peters. And although it was designed to be a quick read, customers spend an average 50 minutes with it -- same as the broadsheet Die Welt. "We reach a very attractive target group," says Mr Peters, adding that circulation has grown 10 percent since launch.

Posted by Ulrike Trux on November 26, 2004 at 02:37 AM in b. Alliances and partnerships: consequences for newsrooms, c. Converged or diverged? The multiplatform newsroom, d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, j. Staff changes, k. Newspapers launches and results, l. Editors conferences, training sessions and awards, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement, n. New sources for Editors, q. Global/Local trends, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack

Newspapers influenced by Internet iconography

Interesting remark from Robert Thomson, The Times editor, in the Globe and Mail, Canada about the new tabloid quality newspapers: "We have to understand that for a great many of our readers, the Internet is part of their daily experience, and I think that in the past, newspapers have been rather arrogant about this, attempting to fashion websites that look like newspapers," he said. "To be honest, we've reached a point where newspapers, in terms of how they look, have to be influenced by Internet iconography. I would argue that the compact [format], while not the same size as a computer screen, has a look of familiarity to the digital reader."

Source: Globe and Mail

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on November 26, 2004 at 02:36 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, g. Visual strategies and photojournalism | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, November 24, 2004

Switzerland: Ringier announces excellent results

Der Standard features the yearly media conference of Swiss publishing company Ringier, at which the executive board revealed excellent results for the year 2004. Ringier's CEO Martin Werfeli predicts that 2004 might possibly turn out to be the company's most successful year since its launch. This prognosis concerns circulation as well as profits. The most successful sector was this year the Eastern European market, as well as first advances of the company onto the Asian market. Werfeli is even content with the situation in their home markets, "despite negative tendencies in the European market," he explained, "we have managed to increase our advertisement income." Concluding with the subject of the tabloidization of Blick, Werfeli said that a general increase of sales at the newsstands was registered while subscriptions have decreased. Ringier's CEO does not see this trend as final, he elucidated that subscribers generally take more time to adapt to changes of their newspaper.

Source: Der Standard

Posted by Ulrike Trux on November 24, 2004 at 07:58 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, q. Global/Local trends, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Friday, November 19, 2004

UK: Soon free lunchtime Standard?

Brand Republic reveals that the Standard is considering to launch a "lite" midday edition ahead of a possible London free-paper launch from Richard Desmond's Express Newspapers. Brand Republic reports, "The Standard's lunchtime free edition could be withdrawn from the newsstands each day in time to make way for the newspaper's later, paid-for editions. Recent reports have suggested that Express Newspapers is close to launching its free title under the name London-i. However, the newspaper group is still waiting for a decision from the Office of Fair Trading on whether Associated's exclusive distribution deal with London Transport is anti-competitive."

Source: Brand Republic through Lovelace Media

Posted by Ulrike Trux on November 19, 2004 at 06:01 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

'Tabloid' is the magic word for publishing companies

The Neue Züricher Zeitung (NZZ) discusses the current trend of publishing companies to develop tabloid editions of their newspapers. "The new trend," NZZ comments, "reminds us of the internet boom of the late 90s.[...] Tabloid is the magic word. Format, text and costs are reduced while number of readers and advertisements are supposed to go up." The newspaper analyses further that so-called 'iPod-Generation' demands specifically short news, readable in the time they need to commute on trains in the morning. NZZ criticizes the efforts of compact newspapers to reduce complex issues to under 60 lines, hence also reducing cost for personnel and print. Nevertheless, the competitive price of the tabloids is a smart marketing move to bring up circulation, according to NZZ. This move is especially interesting for structurally weak regions: "Everyone has got 20 Cents," NZZ concludes.

Source: NZZ through IFRA Executive News

Posted by Ulrike Trux on November 19, 2004 at 05:44 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Thursday, November 18, 2004

Scotsman’s sales decline slowed by move to tabloid format

For some newspapers, the tabloid format gives a mixed blessing. According to MediaWeek, "The Scotsman ’s move to compact format has failed to prevent circulation from falling, the latest readership figures reveal. However, the move, which took place in August, does appear to have slowed the newspaper’s rate of decline. The paper’s daily circulation figure for last month was 69,626 – a year-on-year drop of 0.82%, according to the latest Audit Bureau of Circulations figures for national newspapers. But sales controller Gordon Santana told Media Week that the latest statistics demonstrated that the title had arrested the longer term decline of the past two years, which had revealed average circulation slippages of between 4% and 6%annually. He claimed: “It fully vindicates our decision to go compact."

Source: MediaWeek

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on November 18, 2004 at 01:08 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Friday, November 12, 2004

Axel Springer: Great expectations for the future

Werben und verkaufen reports that Axel Springer , the largest European publishing company, has announced a 2.4% rise in profits due to increased circulation and advertisements income in 2004. Axel Springer's CEO Mathias Döpfner elaborates that the company is content with the performance of their newly launched magazines "Jolie," "Audio Video Foto Bild," "TV Digital," and most of all "Welt kompakt." Döpfner said, "the tabloid newspaper has attracted the targeted group of young readers, who did not read newspapers before." The publishing company regrets lower profits in the area of women's magazines due to strong competitors on the market. For the future Axel Springer envisions the launch of several magazines in China, in an attempt to outdo their successful entry into the Eastern European market.

Source: Werben und verkaufen through IFRA Executive News

Posted by Ulrike Trux on November 12, 2004 at 01:27 AM in d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, November 10, 2004

Why American newspapers are not following the "tabloid format" trend

In an interesting article in Newspaper & Technology, Randy Woods writes about the two main reasons why American newspapers do not seem to follow the path led by European newspapers to go for the "compact" format. Here are the main excerpts: "As wave upon wave of smaller formats pop up in Europe and South America, the scene in the United States is oddly tranquil. With only a handful of exceptions, the traditional broadsheet still reigns supreme among the vast majority of American dailies. “Right now, I know of two U.S. papers that might contemplate the move, but only in terms of testing and prototyping,” said Mario Garcia, president and chief executive officer of the Garcia Media Group, a design firm that has helped dozens of papers around the globe convert to smaller formats. Instead, most U.S. publishers are content to choose less expensive half-measures, such as converting to a narrower, 50-inch web and redesigning their layouts to mimic tabloids’ modular navigation and use of splashy graphics. Much of the reason for this aversion to full-scale change has to do with well-established advertising traditions, Garcia said. “All national ads in the U.S. are sold for the broadsheet format,” he said. “At about 21 inches, it is a very large canvas and is good at showing fashion models on runways and new cars.”

Alan Jacobson , president and chief executive officer of Brass Tacks Design, in Norfolk, Va., said research has repeatedly shown readers prefer the tabloid form for its shorter articles, compact size and ease of navigation. But as long as advertisers pay for the large formats to showcase their products, tabloids will never rival broadsheets in the United States, Jacobson said. ?Outside the U.S., much more consideration is given to the reader than the advertiser,? he said. ?Europeans tend to have longer, stronger, deeper relationships with their newspapers. In the United Kingdom alone there are something like 20 national newspapers. It?s a much different tradition than in the U.S., where a greater proportion of the cost is paid by advertising.?

Randy Woods puts forward another explanation for the tabloid format's lack of popularity in the US: "U.S. tabloids also have to fight against history. "There still is a stigma associated with tabloids,? Jacobson said. ?The expression ?tabloid journalism? is still a negative term in the U.S. Some papers are even trying to get rid of the tabloid label altogether and calling the format a ?compact newspaper.?? Newspaper designer Roger Black, chairman of Danilo Black in New York, said the taint of the tabloid is largely a myth. ?The only stigma remains in the minds of those in the newsroom,? he said. ?Look at Europe. Look at Le Monde, El Pais, La Repubblica. Those are some of the most respected papers in the world, and they are all tabloids, or at least look like tabloids."

Source: Newspaper & Technology through IWantMedia

Posted by Valérie Gazzano on November 10, 2004 at 04:43 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

UK: Tabloid and broadsheet front page debate

A debate among editors mainly opposed Independent editor Simon Kelner and Guardian's Alan Rusbridger on the use of opinion-led front pages. "Kelner has defended his paper's use of opinion-led front pages, arguing that newspapers were on the verge of becoming "viewspapers", reports Chris Tryhorn for The Guardian. "[Our front pages] vary greatly from an important piece of comment, a graphical presentation of an important news story to something with a strong campaigning edge, said Kelner. "It's always a newspaper of strong opinions, and that's what our readers want. Every time we have a concept-driven front page, we have a spike in the circulation. The views behind the news, it's more and more what newspapers must do. We cannot compete with electronic media and immediate news." Mr Rusbridger took issue with the Independent editor over this, arguing that newspapers should focus on news first and bring in opinion later. "What matters is journalism," he said. "I profoundly disagreed with Simon when it comes to views and news. News is where it all has to start and whether that's trustworthy."

The Guardian editor said the Independent - which has escalated the use of opinion-led front pages since it went fully tabloid six months ago - was not being "really innovative", but employing techniques common to traditional tabloids such as the Daily Mail. "It's different from what people thought newspapers were about, and it's a dangerous slope... The great danger is in convergence. If we are going to have a converging market with people using the same techniques, then that's a problem."

Source: MediaGuardian

Posted by Valérie Gazzano on November 10, 2004 at 03:59 AM in c. Converged or diverged? The multiplatform newsroom, e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, g. Visual strategies and photojournalism, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

UK: 20% more copies for the new tabloid Saturday Times

According to MediaGuardian, "The first tabloid edition of the Saturday Times got off to a strong start at the weekend, with sales up almost 20% on the previous weekend. The Saturday paper sold 850,000 copies in its first incarnation as a tabloid, helped by widespread interest in the paper's historic decision to dump its broadsheet edition and a widespread promotional campaign... The paper's circulation was also boosted by a DVD giveaway... The internal figures show circulation of the first Saturday tabloid edition leapt 18.8% on the previous weekend, the last broadsheet edition, which itself was a strong sale due to its historic nature... The newspaper embarked on an extensive promotional campaign to launch itself as a compact."

Source: MediaGuardian

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on November 10, 2004 at 03:15 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Monday, November 08, 2004

UK Times ' tabloid format: circulation boost and advertisers' claims

What are the consequences of the broadsheet Times' disappearance last Monday? The two main consequences regard circulation and a possible conflict with advertisers. Did the change of format influence circulation numbers? According to The Times itself, "Insiders at The Daily Telegraph claim that about 15,000 Times refuseniks have defected since last Monday when the broadsheet Times disappeared. Times executives challenge this, and say sales have been up by as much as 30,000 a day since Monday." Stephen Brook from The Guardian said that "turning tabloid has given the Times a circulation boost. Last week, the first that the newspaper published only as a tabloid, circulation rose about 12% for full-price copies, according to provisional figures. But the US elections combined with the end of the half-term holiday boosted sales of all the papers last week."

How does the change to the compact format affect the advertising rates? It is not a surprise that "the move to halve the paper?s size has sparked a fierce argument with the advertising industry over how much it should now cost to take out a page of advertising, or part of a page, in the new, reduced format", reports The Times. "Battlelines are being drawn and the outcome will have big implications, not just for The Times, but for the rest of the quality newspaper industry." According to Stephen Brook, "several media buyers contacted by MediaGuardian.co.uk said they have refused to accept the new pricing policy and could even pull out of the Times altogether."

Source: The Times, MediaGuardian
through IFRA

Posted by Valérie Gazzano on November 8, 2004 at 03:53 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, q. Global/Local trends, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Thursday, November 04, 2004

"Newspapers are the media of the future"

German newroom.de reported the outcomes of a conference on the future of the media in Leipzig last Saturday. In an interview with the German Press Agency Dpa, the media-expert Michael Haller summarizes the results of the conference as follows: "Newspapers are the media of the future, but to survive in the struggle against radio, TV, and internet; they have to undergo changes. Editors have to learn to please the changing demands of the public." He further illuminates that it is important to be more flexible when it comes to closing dates for the newspapers. "Readers want to find in-depths analysis of the news the saw on the TV the night before in their morning paper," says Haller. The expert also suggests to switch to a tabloid format, in order to attract and involve new readers through compact format and pertinent writing.

Source: newroom.de

Posted by Ulrike Trux on November 4, 2004 at 02:19 AM in c. Converged or diverged? The multiplatform newsroom, d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, l. Editors conferences, training sessions and awards | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Monday, November 01, 2004

UK: when broadsheet format follows the way of the dodo

Interesting article from The Independent about today's final new format of The Times. But I prefer to quote the paragraph dedicated to The Daily Telegraph: "The case of the Daily Telegraph, now owned by the Barclay Brothers, is the most interesting of all. The paper, which saw a circulation fall of 3.6 per cent in the past 12 months to 900,702, will now see an opportunity in the market. Until the entire newspaper world goes totally tabloid and the larger format follows the way of the dodo, the Telegraph will soon be able to market itself not just as "a bestseller" but as the last remaining quality broadsheet. It might even help to reverse the paper's decline and retain choice of format in the market."

Source : The Independent. See also the editorial from Robert Thomson, The Times editor.

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on November 1, 2004 at 02:19 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Saturday, October 30, 2004

UK: for 216 years (and not one more), The Times has been published as a broadsheet

The Times newspaper will be printed in tabloid form only from Monday after more than 200 years as a broadsheet, it has been announced. The decision to scrap its broadsheet edition was made after a successful trial run of the tabloid version. Times editor Robert Thomson said: "The launch of the compact has transformed the fortunes of the newspaper." Since publishing a broadsheet and tabloid version, sales of the paper have gone up by 4.5%.

Source: BBC news

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on October 30, 2004 at 08:18 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Friday, October 15, 2004

UK: winners and losers in circulation

Associated Newspapers successful Metro title has reached the one millipn copies mark for the first time in its five-year history amid another poor month for a number of paid-for titles. The main winners and losers, in terms of year on year increases or decreases in circulation (ABC figures) in the UK, are: Daily Mirror – 1,793,718 - down 7.52% The Sun – 3,336,422 - down 5.31% The Guardian – 376,314 - down 4.80% The Daily Telegraph – 900,702 - down 3.60% Daily Mail – 2,442,875 - down 1.53% Financial Times – 437,717 - up 0.87% Metro (UK-wide) – 1,005,867 – up 4.10% The Times – 660,906 - up 4.53% The Independent – 264,594 - up 21.06%

Source: MediaWeek

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on October 15, 2004 at 04:44 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Monday, October 11, 2004

UK: The Times' gamble "to go all compact"?

From : The Independent According to Sholto Byrnes, “The decision has been made for The Times to “go all compact”. Nearly a year after beginning to publish the compact edition alongside the broadsheet, it is now only a matter of time before the Saturday edition will be available only in compact form, with the weekdays editions to follow. News International (The Times’ owner) is trying to persuade the readers of the virtue of the compact form, but ditching the broadsheet completely will be a huge gamble for the Times, as some readers are firmly wedded to the larger format."

Source: The Independent

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on October 11, 2004 at 02:04 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, f. Weekly supplements, g. Visual strategies and photojournalism, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Wednesday, September 22, 2004

Germany: third new tabloid in October 2004

DuMont Schauberg group, a German regional press group, will launch in October 2004 a new tabloid for young readers and commuters in Köln. The newspaper - no title so far - will be sold for 50 cents like Welt Kompakt (Axel Springer group) and News (Handelsblatt group). The tabloid will be done with the staff of the Koelner Stadt Anzeiger owned by DuMont Schauberg group. This group also edits the very popular Express in Köln.

Source: AFP through Voilà (in French)

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on September 22, 2004 at 04:45 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, k. Newspapers launches and results | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Friday, September 17, 2004

Singapore: end of the competition game

According to AFP, "Singapore's two biggest media groups announced a merger of their loss-making television and newspaper operations just four years after competition was introduced in the industry. Top publisher Singapore Press Holdings Ltd. (SPH), whose foray into television has resulted in heavy losses, and broadcaster MediaCorp., whose sole newspaper has also failed to make money, called it a "win-win solution". SPH, publisher of a stable of profitable newspapers led by the Straits Times, will give up its two floundering television channels to MediaCorp... SPH will also take a 40 percent stake in MediaCorp Press, publisher of the subscription-free newspaper Today, which had been set up to compete with the Straits Times. SPH will merge its free tabloid Streats with Today, leaving Singapore with only one newspaper distributed for free to readers."

Source: AFP

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on September 17, 2004 at 01:33 AM in b. Alliances and partnerships: consequences for newsrooms, e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, September 14, 2004

Canada: The Globe and Mail launches 7

According to Publicitas, "The Globe and Mail has just launched "7", a weekly guide to entertainment and the arts in Toronto. 7 will run in the Metro edition of the newspaper as an essential, critical guide to arts and entertainment in the city - with reviews, listings, features on celebrities both international and local, plus insider's tips on how to make the most of a week well planned. The tabloid-format, pullout section will replace the Friday edition of Globe Review in the paper. Globe Review will continue to run Saturday to Thursday and in the national editions of the newspaper... The section's editor is Maryam Sanati and content will be provided by Globe writers."

Source: Publicitas

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on September 14, 2004 at 01:15 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, f. Weekly supplements | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Monday, September 13, 2004

Germany: Frankfurt gets new tabloid format newspaper

As said in a former posting, AFP confirmed that "the publishers of the German business daily Handeslblatt added Monday to the growing number of cheap, tabloid format newspapers launching the "News" in Frankfurt, western Germany. Priced at 50 euro cents (61 US cents), the newspaper is aimed at giving readers in the 20-39 age bracket a summary of the major news stories in about 15 minutes reading time, said Handeslblatt chairman Harald Muesse. The publishers estimate a potential of 80,000 readers in Germany's business capital and 300,000 in the region, including the cities of Wiesbaden and Mainz. Twenty-five journalists will work on the new paper and will be able to use articles from Handeslblatt and its partner in Berlin, the daily Tagesspiegel. In May, Axel Springer launched a compact issue of the Die Welt broadsheet and the publisher is planning on a similar version of the mass-market Bild daily, Germany's most widely-read newspaper."

According to Bloomberg.com, "News'' will combine elements of magazines and newspapers and targets the ``iPod-Generation,'' named after the iPod digital music player made by Apple Computer Inc., Handelsblatt said. The newspaper will have interactive elements and will allow its readers to vote via Internet or mobile-phone text message about the next day's local stories."

Sources: AFP and Bloomberg.com

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on September 13, 2004 at 08:34 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Saturday, September 11, 2004

UK: serious decline of classical tabloids

Good point from Peter Cole in The Independent: "The two issues that will dominate the new newspaper year will be the decline in the tabloid market and the compact factor in the quality market. Consider the five dominant tabloids, and their loss of sale. Using circulation figures giving an average over the past six months compared with a similar period a year ago (this gives a more accurate picture of the trend than the month-on-month snapshot), we see the following: Daily Mirror: down 5.9 per cent; Sun: down 4.9 per cent; News of the World: down 2.1 per cent; People: down 7.7 per cent; Sunday Mirror: down 2.7 per cent. In terms of numbers of copies, the daily tabloid market is down by 240,000 and the Sunday market by 275,000. This is a serious decline, and shows no sign of slowing."

Source: The Independent

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on September 11, 2004 at 04:10 PM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Friday, September 10, 2004

Irish News to switch to a compact format

The Irish News has revealed plans to switch to a new compact format next spring, when it opens its own £12m purpose-built press facility. The move will give the paper a capacity of 96-pages of full-colour, and will see it change from its current Euro, or Berliner format - adopted when it switched from a traditional broadsheet in 2000 - to compact which is approximately 10cm shorter. Editor Noel Doran said: "The switch to a compact format will improve the Irish News in every respect. We will maintain the highest standards of quality in the paper while offering an enhanced service to readers and advertisers."

Source:holdthefrontpage

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on September 10, 2004 at 01:49 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, September 07, 2004

Sweden: 11 dailies will soon turn tabloids

It's always a pleasure to read Media Culpa on the Swedish press. Hans Kullin tells us that "Starting October 5, in total 11 Swedish dailies are leaving broadsheet format and turn tabloids. The timetable is: Oct 5: Dagens Nyheter, Göteborgs-Posten, Sydsvenska Dagbladet Oct 13: Vestmanlands Läns Tidning Fall 2004: Skånska Dagbladet, Östersunds-Posten Feb 1, 2005: Östgöta Correspondenten, Upsala Nya Tidning Spring 2005: Sundsvalls Tidning, Borås Tidning, Nerikes Allehanda

Source: Media Culpa

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on September 7, 2004 at 02:52 PM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Switzerland: 20 Minutes becomes the most popular daily

The free newspaper 20 Minutes has overtaken the Blick tabloid to become the most popular daily in Switzerland...20 Minutes – the 30-page tabloid which carries Swiss and international news in short, easy-to-read articles – saw its readership grow 13 per cent last year, from 692,000 to 782,000, following a 40 per cent increase in the previous year. It was followed by Blick with a readership of 736,000, and the “Tages-Anzeiger” with 573,000 readers. The top-selling French language paper was “Le Matin” with 331,000 regular readers. Readers are increasingly favouring papers which adopt a lighter format, said the Zurich-based media research firm, WEMF, which carried out the research... In recent months Blick has also gone tabloid. But Bernhard Weissberg, who oversees the newspaper division of Blick publisher Ringier, declined to comment on how that had affected circulation. Weissberg told swissinfo that 20 Minutes could not be compared with the traditional dailies. "It’s a free newspaper, so naturally it is read, but it’s very different from what we do. We draw a distinction between a free newspaper and a newspaper which offers depth.”

Source: SwissInfo through IFRA newsletter

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on September 7, 2004 at 04:15 AM in d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack

Wednesday, September 01, 2004

Germany: new quality tabloid launched by Handelsblatt group

On 14 September in the region of Frankfurt am Main, a new compact will be launched by the Handelsblatt group using the editorial resources of the group but also with a 40 journalists staff. Klaus Madzia will be the editor.

Source: Berliner Zeitung (in German)

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on September 1, 2004 at 04:10 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, k. Newspapers launches and results | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

New Zealand: Herald on Sunday will be compact

"APN News & Media, publisher of the New Zealand Herald, today announced the launch date (3 October 2004) and format of its new Auckland Sunday newspaper, the Herald on Sunday: it will be in "compact" format. APN NZ National Publishing Chief Executive Ken Steinke said the decision to go "compact" rather than the traditional broadsheet was driven by strong consumer demand, and the international trend of large format, quality newspapers moving to a more convenient, user-friendly size."

Source: New Zealand Herald

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on September 1, 2004 at 03:40 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, August 24, 2004

Malaysia: the New Straits Times in two sizes from 1 September

Frrom Publicitas: "The Malaysian New Straits Times (NTSP) will break from a 159-year-old tradition by publishing two versions of the newspaper — a tabloid-size daily along with the broadsheet format. New Straits Times Press chief executive officer Syed Faisal Albar said NSTP Berhad, the largest newspaper group in the country, would continue to publish the same number of broadsheet copies to cater to its loyal readers. However, it will also print, initially, extra 50,000 copies of the compact version to be distributed within the Klang Valley. He said the company did not currently plan to phase out the broadsheet.

The NSTP publishes six other titles besides the New Straits Times and the New Sunday Times. They are the English-language tabloids the Malay Mail and the Sunday Mail, the Bahasa Malaysia broadsheet Berita Harian and its Sunday edition Berita Minggu and the late-morning Bahasa Malaysia tabloids Harian Metro and Metro Ahad.

The NSTP sells more than 600,000 copies of the newspapers within its group daily and 796,000 on Sunday, a total increase of 11 per cent and six per cent respectively over the corresponding period in 2003. In July 2004, the daily average increased by 10 per cent while on Sunday, the group averaged sales of 833,000 copies.

NSTP group editor-in-chief Datuk Kalimullah Hassan said the compact version was not a new idea as it had been discussed and debated by the management over the last 20 years.

... Since beginning this year, the newspaper has recruited some of the top writers in the region to beef up its coverage. They include Philip Bowring, who writes for the International Herald Tribune and is former editor of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and Frank Ching, a well regarded columnist from the FEER who writes on China.

Source: Publicitas newsletter and NST press release

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on August 24, 2004 at 08:16 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, August 18, 2004

UK: The Scotsman to go compact

Since Monday 16 August, The Scotsman is published in a compact size every day. The move follows the success of the newspaper’s Saturday edition, which moved to the reader-friendly style in March. It is an historic change to 187 year old Scotland’s leading quality daily. The Scotsman’s Saturday edition, which became compact on 6 March, saw marked increases in sales, putting on an extra 7 to 18 per cent compared to the previous year. Iain Martin, the editor of The Scotsman, said: "It’s so important for all of those who care about indigenous, Scottish newspapers that see the world through Scottish eyes - and The Scotsman is a leader in this - that we move with the times." And the Cardiff-based Western Mail, Wales, has announced plans to switch formats in October.

Source: The Scotsman via Publicitas

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on August 18, 2004 at 03:54 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Thursday, August 05, 2004

Scotsman to go completely compact

Media Bulletin reports that the Scotsman, owned by the Barclay brothers, is set to go compact Monday through Friday after a trial run, begun in May, in which the Saturday edition was published in the tabloid format. The Barclays recently acquired the Daily Telegraph, and have said it is not out of the question that a compact format be instituted there as well.

Source: Media Bulletin

Posted by Dana Goldstein on August 5, 2004 at 05:20 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, i. What is newsworthy or how to reshape the future of the newspaper | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Monday, July 26, 2004

You say you want a revolution...

From The Times of London and Media Guardian: Media columnist Brian MacArthur of The Times argued Friday that the web is the saving grace of a newspaper industry beset by declining readership. He used The Guardian as an example, noting that of about nine million unique visitors monthly to the paper's web site, only one third are British, another third are American and the rest are international. These huge numbers indicate that The Guardian is becoming the "English language’s global liberal voice," MacArthur writes, paraphrasing Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger. He concludes, "I wonder which of the major developments in the broadsheet newspapers of the past decade will history judge to be the more significant — the switch to a compact format, or the investment they have made online?"

Meanwhile The Guardian itself has given Independent editor Simon Kelner a platform to boast about the transition to compact form. Kelner says, "We've certainly made people think seriously about how their newspapers are packaged and delivered, and we've challenged the prejudices and preconceptions about whether it's possible to do an upmarket, quality tabloid. Whether we've revolutionised the entire newspaper market we'll only know when the revolution is over. It's just the beginning." Which do you think the history books will remember...newspapers' size and shape transition, or the transition in medium?

Source: The Times of London and Media Guardian

Posted by Dana Goldstein on July 26, 2004 at 05:46 AM in a. Is blogging journalism?, c. Converged or diverged? The multiplatform newsroom, d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, g. Visual strategies and photojournalism, h. New readers: how to involve them, i. What is newsworthy or how to reshape the future of the newspaper, q. Global/Local trends, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Friday, July 23, 2004

Scotland: Another daily goes tabloid

From North Tonight: Following The Scotsman's decision to transition to a tabloid design on Saturdays, the Press and Journal, a regional newspaper in Aberdeen, Scotland, will also change format, promising to listen to feedback from readers in the process.

Source: North Tonight

Posted by Dana Goldstein on July 23, 2004 at 02:34 AM in d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, g. Visual strategies and photojournalism, i. What is newsworthy or how to reshape the future of the newspaper, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Friday, July 09, 2004

Murdoch may have been source for Kerry-Gephardt "fake exclusive"

From the New York Times: Everyone has heard by now about the New York Post's major league gaffe in reporting that John Kerry had chosen Dick Gephardt -- not John Edwards -- as his running mate. Today the New York Times reports, based on an interview with a Post employee who asked to remain anonymous, that News Corporation chairman and Post publisher Rupert Murdoch was the source for the "scoop," which was published without a byline. Through an official spokesman, the Post denied the rumor. In an accompanying column, Clyde Haberman criticizes news agencies for chasing after "fake exclusives" - slightly premature announcements of official news that is about to be released anyway. "This is not to be confused with real scoops, which break new ground by exploring important topics ignored or given short shrift everywhere else," Haberman writes. "They are the stuff of genuinely competitive journalism, from revelations about the My Lai massacre in Vietnam to the tales of Abu Ghraib prison abuses."

Source: 2 articles from the New York Times

Posted by Dana Goldstein on July 9, 2004 at 06:49 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, i. What is newsworthy or how to reshape the future of the newspaper, o. Ethics and Press Freedom | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Thursday, July 08, 2004

Though free, "subway tabs" may not give young readers what they want, columnist says

Speaking of the success of free dailies, Village Voice press columnist Richard Goldstein has written an essay on how "subway tabloids" such as Metro and amNewYork are affecting newspaper readership habits in the city, especially among the young. Free dailies actually may not be the future of young readership, Goldstein argues, because although they earn points for being easily accessible, they don't provide what young readers continually say they want in their news coverage -- strong, opinionated writing. In fact, Goldstein's column reminds me that amNewYork has been known to shy away from controversial opinions being expressed on its pages -- see this posting about the brouhaha that ensued when the paper's publisher refused to run a column critical of Israel.

Goldstein also reports that advertorial could soon be part of the free daily reading experience: "Metro's mission statement boasts of allowing ads to intrude on the content, with company logos appearing as shadows behind the classifieds, or products protruding into a story," he writes. "One foreign edition of Metro, displayed in its media kit, has the nose of a plane jutting into the type. That hasn't actually happened in New York ? and it may never, says (Henry E. Scott, managing director of Metro New York) ? but I'll wager that the 'integrated' ad is coming soon to a subway stop, if not a newsstand, near you."

Source: The Village Voice (New York City alternative weekly) and a previous posting

Posted by Dana Goldstein on July 8, 2004 at 02:11 AM in a. Is blogging journalism?, d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, g. Visual strategies and photojournalism, h. New readers: how to involve them, i. What is newsworthy or how to reshape the future of the newspaper, k. Newspapers launches and results, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Spain: New report ranks newspaper readership

From the Associacion para la Investigacion de Medios de Communicacion: The Estudio General de Medios (Spanish media study) for October 2003 to May 2004 has been released, ranking Spanish newspaper readership. In order with readership in parentheses, the top five are: Marca (2,632,000) El Pais (2,098,000), El Mundo (1,251,000), As (949,000) and El Periodico (885,000). But when the free dailies Metro and 20 Minutes are included, they assume the number 3 and number 4 positions with 1,781,000 and 1,555,000 readers respectively.

Source: Associacion para la Investigacion de Medios de Communicacion

Posted by Dana Goldstein on July 8, 2004 at 01:41 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, i. What is newsworthy or how to reshape the future of the newspaper, k. Newspapers launches and results | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, July 07, 2004

Compact format: the domino effect across Europe

A very good synthesis from Louis Jebb, The Independent, about the "compact fever" across Europe, Russia, Egypt... I'll just mention the timeline at the end of the article: "30 September 2003 The Independent becomes the first dual-format newspaper, December 2003 The Times goes dual-format, 21 January 2004, The Belgian regional Gazet van Antwerpen goes dual-format, switching to compact format only in March, February 2004 The Irish Independent launches a compact edition, adding 10 per cent to sales, 6 March 2004 The Scotsman launches a Saturday compact edition, May 2004 Switzerland's largest-selling title, Blick, goes dual-format, 24 May 2004 Axel Springer, the German publisher, launches trial for Welt Kompakt, taking stories from its broadsheets, Die Welt and the Berliner Morgenpost, 17 May 2004 The Independent drops broadsheet format and becomes the first quality compact newspaper, June 2004 The Guardian and The Observer will adopt Le Monde-size format in 2006, autumn 2004 three of Sweden's main newspapers plan to go compact, January 2005, Norway's leading daily, Aftenposten, plans to go compact.

Source: The Independent

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on July 7, 2004 at 02:14 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, June 29, 2004

UK: The Guardian to go compact by 2006 as it invests £50m

I maybe missed that before but I think Tim Burt, Media Editor of the Financial Timesis the first to give the information: "Guardian Media Group, the newspaper publisher behind The Guardian, has approved a £50m investment to relaunch its titles in a compact format. The Guardian and The Observer, its Sunday sister title, will become the country's first national titles to adopt the "Berliner" shape and size, used by European papers such as Le Monde (between tabloid and broadsheet). Staff were last week briefed on the plans, which will involve significant investment in new presses to replace the 20-year-old printing facilities. Company insiders described the plans as the biggest shake-up since the Manchester Guardian moved to London 40 years ago and the redesign of 1988. Although the company has not yet signed firm orders or contracts for the presses, the new format is expected to be launched about 2006.

"... Average net circulation at The Guardian fell 6.06 per cent to 379,115 a day in the last six-month period, according to the Audit Bureau of Circulations. The Observer's average circulation was down 1.24 per cent to 450,593 in the same period.

Source: Financial Times

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on June 29, 2004 at 03:32 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, g. Visual strategies and photojournalism, k. Newspapers launches and results | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

U.K: New evening newspaper could be called London i

From Brand Republic: Richard Desmond, owner of Express Newspapers, has gone through three possible names in his quest to launch a London evening newspaper to compete with Associated Newspapers' Evening Star and Metro. In a legal battle, Associated Newspapers prevented Desmond from calling his paper the Evening Mail. The second title floated to the press was PM. Now it's London i. Names aside, the major obstacle in Desmond's way is Associated Newspapers' exclusive distribution deal with London Underground, which effectively prevents other publishers from entering the free evening-daily market to compete with Metro. The distribution deal is now being investigated by the Office of Fair Trading.

Source: Brand Republic

Posted by Dana Goldstein on June 29, 2004 at 02:43 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, i. What is newsworthy or how to reshape the future of the newspaper, k. Newspapers launches and results | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Friday, June 25, 2004

Check out “Magazines and the Environment”

Most of us don’t stop very often to think about the actual paper our newspapers and magazines are printed on, let alone how the production of our publications contributes to problems like deforestation, global warming and harmful air emissions. For a good primer on these issues, check out “Magazines and the Environment,” a report prepared by the International Federation of the Periodical Press and the European Federation of Magazine Publishers. “In many ways, (publishing) has the potential to be one of the most self-sustaining and environmentally sound of industries,” IFPP Chairwoman Sally Cartwright writes in the report’s introduction, “because its main resource, paper, is both made form renewable resources and recyclable.”

Source: IFPP and EFMP

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on June 25, 2004 at 07:13 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, i. What is newsworthy or how to reshape the future of the newspaper, n. New sources for Editors, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Monday, June 21, 2004

Sweden: Dagens Nyheter will change to compact size

I missed this information last week: "The Swedish daily newspaper Dagens Nyheter (second largest newspaper after Aftonbladet and before Expressen) will follow the Swedish newspaper trend and change its news and opinion pages from a broadsheet format to a compact size. "We have long been discussing the decision to shift entirely to the tabloid format, says the Editor-in-Chief of Dagens Nyheter, Jan Wifstrand. Most readers find the smaller size appealing and the change now reflects the many requests from our readers. When the change will take place has not been finally decided yet. First we have to resolve all technical and editorial issues. The business, sports, culture, travel, real estate, auto and Söndag sections are already published in tabloid size."

Source: Publicitas

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on June 21, 2004 at 08:13 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Tuesday, June 15, 2004

Germany: Tabloid version of Die Welt to be tested in Berlin

From Le Monde: German publisher Axel Springer will be testing Welt Kompakt a compact format of its Berlin daily newspaper, Die Welt, for the next eight weeks. The move follows on the heels of similar decisions made by The Times of London and The Telegraph in the U.K., and after Axel Springer launched Fakt in Poland in tabloid format, and then saw it quickly trounce its competition. The publisher hopes to attract a younger audience for Die Welt, which has a current circulation of 203,000, Le Monde reports. Editorially, the compact edition will go to press later than its broadsheet counterpart, will be only about half the number of pages, and will featured "reworked" articles appearing in the broadsheet.

Source: Le Monde

Posted by Dana Goldstein on June 15, 2004 at 04:30 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Monday, June 14, 2004

Compact questions

From Media Guardian: The "compact revolution" was the catchword on everyone's lips at our 11th World Editors Forum in Istanbul. Today, columnist Roy Greenslade employs the same metaphor to imply that perhaps the revolutionaries have gotten a bit carried away in their overhaul of traditional newspaper formatting: "Revolutions are never smooth transitions. After an initial burst of fervour there are usually periods of relative calm during which everyone - the leaders and the led - are able to assess whether tearing up the old world was a good idea after all. It is a worrying time for the leaders because they can't go back. But how do they maintain the momentum? Why, they ask themselves, has the initial euphoria vanished? That's the quandary facing both the Independent and the Times just now in the great compact revolution. As the latest official circulation figures reveal, the sales rises prompted by the move away from the broadsheet format have slowed dramatically in the past couple of months."

Source: Media Guardian

Posted by Dana Goldstein on June 14, 2004 at 02:05 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, June 09, 2004

How practical is it for The Times of London to publish in two formats?

From Media Guardian: At our 11th Annual Editors Forum in Istanbul, Managing Editor of The Times of London George Brock spoke about The Times' decision to make both broadsheet and tabloid formats of the paper available to readers. Now, Media Guardian columnist Jane Martinson asks how financially practical that decision really is. Unlike the readership of rival The Independent, which has gone completely compact, The Times' readership has shown itself to be more committed to the broadsheet format, Martison writes...

"The Times may want to produce a tabloid-only version of the paper, to cut costs and ease editorial stresses, but in doing so it risks alienating some 300,000 broadsheet readers. Thus the efforts to encourage more readers to buy the tabloid. The paper has said very little about these plans but its own promotions make it obvious. It has introduced variable pricing and has run a series of full-page ads promoting the tabloid in the paper...Among newsagents already finding it difficult to stock the broadsheet are "large supermarkets, travel points and garage forecourts". And Times journalists are already starting to gripe about the earlier deadlines demanded by the extra editions. The circulation gains do not even make it seem worthwhile in percentage terms."

Source: Media Guardian

Posted by Dana Goldstein on June 9, 2004 at 06:32 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, June 08, 2004

Switzerland: After trial period, Blick to adopt "compact" format

From Publicitas Media News: Add one more name to the list of European papers jumping on the tabloid - or "compact" - bandwagon. Beginning June 14, daily newspaper Blick will completely abandon its broadsheet format after a trial period in which the paper appeared as both a tabloid and a broadsheet. According to Blick's publisher, Ringier, newsstand sales increased five to ten percent when the tabloid format was introduced, and 69% of Blick's readers chose to purchase the compact, not the broadsheet, version of the paper.

Source: Publicitas Media News

Posted by Dana Goldstein on June 8, 2004 at 05:59 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, i. What is newsworthy or how to reshape the future of the newspaper, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Brit vs. Yank journalism: subjectivity, objectivity and competition

Columbia Journalism Review has moderated a lengthy debate between Michael Getler, the ombudsman at The Washington Post, and Leonard Doyle, the foreign editor at The Independent in London, on the merits and shortcomings of British and American journalism. Getler and Doyle really go at it each other, with Doyle sharply indicting the American press' coverage of international conflicts and Getler claiming the British press is partisan and poorly sourced. Two major subjects emerge in the debate: the line between subjectivity and objectivity, and the comparative lack of competition between big, American newspapers compared to their British counterparts. Here are excerpts from Getler and Doyle's arguments:

Getler: "I remember a healthy and widespread British devotion to breaking stories, looking under rocks, and wonderful features. As a reader, I enjoyed what seemed to be the fruits of required journalism courses on being clever. But I found the lack of attribution on many stories, especially political reporting, to be maddening in terms of understanding (perhaps because I was an outsider) and just plain laziness and acquiescence to the lobby system of insider reporting...I think the contrast with the best American newspapers is that you probably had to read more than one British paper to get a more confident and balanced understanding of what was going on."

Doyle: "How badly we needed -- before the war -- solid reporting that explained how a kitchen cabinet of neoconservatives and their bellicose friends were cooking up a war that has brought so much bloodshed to Iraq and danger to the world. Surely we need to reassess the whole concept of "embedded" reporting. Consider this conundrum: How could it be that Scott Ritter, the most famous U.S. inspector and the one person who got it right about Saddam Hussein?s supposed arsenal of WMD, was treated with total suspicion? Meanwhile, dubious exiles with no inherent knowledge of WMD were treated with great respect by TV and newspapers. One explanation may lie in the structure of U.S. print journalism, where big media organizations like the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, and The Washington Post are lumbering beasts with no real competition breathing down their necks. The result is an overcautious press that has fantastic resources at its disposal, but frankly disappoints when it comes to exposing the administration to rigorous scrutiny."

Source: Columbia Journalism Review

Posted by Dana Goldstein on June 8, 2004 at 03:43 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, i. What is newsworthy or how to reshape the future of the newspaper, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement, o. Ethics and Press Freedom, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack

Thursday, June 03, 2004

A content-based comparison of NYC's free dailies

From Editor and Publisher, an astute comparison of the editorial content in New York City's two free daily tabloids - Metro NY and amNewYork. According to the article, Metro NY, part of the Metro International chain of free daily tabloids in 16 countries, focuses on international news and is primarily composed of wire stories, while amNewYork's front page features local crime news and its internal articles are more likely to be written by staff members. Other interesting comparisons were that Metro ran a travel section where amNewYork included health coverage, and less than 25% of Metro's pages are devoted to ad-space, compared to over 40% in amNewYork.

Source: Editor and Publisher

Posted by Dana Goldstein on June 3, 2004 at 07:26 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, i. What is newsworthy or how to reshape the future of the newspaper, q. Global/Local trends, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

New designs at the Seattle Times and the Financial Times

There was a lot of talk at the World Editors Forum in Istanbul this week about design and format changes for daily papers - particularly the trend of switching from broadsheet to tabloid. Here are articles from The Guardian and Editor and Publisher about redesigns at the Seattle Times and the Financial Times that are sweeping in scope, but stop short of abandoning the broadsheet format.

Source: The Guardian and Editor and Publisher

Posted by Dana Goldstein on June 3, 2004 at 05:54 AM in d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, g. Visual strategies and photojournalism | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, June 02, 2004

Times of London Editor Elected President of World Editors Forum

George Brock, Managing Editor of The Times of London, has been elected President of the World Editors Forum, the global association dealing with issues of professional concern to senior news executives -- and the parent organization of this weblog. Mr Brock succeeds Gloria Brown Anderson of the New York Times. "WEF is the only global organisation devoted to raising and maintaining the quality of journalism in newsrooms," said Mr Brock. "In addition to joining in press freedom campaigns with the World Association of Newspapers, I would like to build up WEF's role as a network of editors who meet to exchange and debate best practice, trends and changes which affect journalists everywhere."

The WEF, the organisation for editors within the World Association of Newspapers, provides senior news executives with an arena in which to exchange ideas and information about the business of editing newspapers. Its flagship event is its annual conference, held in conjunction with WAN's World Newspaper Congress, the premier annual event of the global newspaper industry.

Mr Brock's election was announced at the the WEF Annual General Meeting, held on Wednesday during the World Editors Forum summit in Istanbul, Turkey.

As Managing Editor for The Times, Mr Brock, 52, is responsible for editorial strategy and planning, recruitment, resources and media regulation. He was the launch editor of the compact edition of The Times.

He joined the Times in 1981 and has been a features writer and editor, Opinion Page editor, Foreign Editor (1987-1990), bureau chief in Brussels (1991-1995), and European Editor (1995-1997). He has contributed to newspapers across the world and broadcast frequently on the BBC.

He has been a member of the board of the WEF since 2001 and he sits on the British committee of the International Press Institute. He is a governor of the Anglo-American Ditchley Foundation.

Posted by Dana Goldstein on June 2, 2004 at 03:31 AM in b. Alliances and partnerships: consequences for newsrooms, c. Converged or diverged? The multiplatform newsroom, d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, f. Weekly supplements, g. Visual strategies and photojournalism, h. New readers: how to involve them, i. What is newsworthy or how to reshape the future of the newspaper, j. Staff changes, k. Newspapers launches and results, l. Editors conferences, training sessions and awards, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement, n. New sources for Editors, o. Ethics and Press Freedom, p. Quotation of the day, q. Global/Local trends, r. What new revenues and new business models?, s. 2004 World Editors Forum in Istanbul | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, June 01, 2004

The Times: "For something that hasn't changed for over 100 years, we're really beginning to heat up!"

At the 11th World Editors Forum today, David Wadmore (bio below), Associated Head of Design, The Times, shared the story of how the front page of The Times has changed over time. "What we have experienced over the last year is not just a front page revolution, but rather a revolution of the entire paper...What we were embarking on was a tightrope act, a tightrope act with two wires." Mr. Wadmore stressed the importance of keeping the paper's visual signature constant while simultaneously implementing several format changes. "Keep the message simple and controlled," he advised to others. "Try not to be everything to all people all the time."

The Times' front page revolution actually started several years ago with the appearance of a new much clearer typeface. "Look in great detail at every single element on your front page," Wadmore advised.

Mr. Wadmore then shared several reflections about The Times' new compact version. He revealed that visually, many advertisers were actually pleased with the switch to a compact format because adverts of the same size got much larger play in the compact version. "It's also much harder for designers to kill adverts off which is something we're always trying to do." Similarly, addressing another common fear related to compact size, he added, "Surprisingly we've discovered that a compact does give you more editoral space."

Moreover, he highlighted the opportunity in compact version to use photographs better and cover breaking news closer thanks to the compact's later deadline. Wadmore cautioned however that it is "vital to make sure that you give readers visual navigational tools." Specifically adding, "a picture without a caption is like a dead man on a page."

David Wadmore is Associate Head of Design at The Times, specialising currently in the design of news pages. He was jointly responsible for the launch appearance of The Times' compact edition and was on the team that introduced the Hermes editorial system to the paper. He has worked on all sections of the paper and helped design and introduce the new Times typeface. Wadmore art directed magazines from teenage titles to celebrity weeklies, and has art edited a number of Fleet Street newspapers and color magazines. He has also worked on titles in Canada, Hungary and Russia. Wadmore studied advertising design at Art College. He is 55, married and has an antique printing press.

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on June 1, 2004 at 07:17 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, g. Visual strategies and photojournalism, s. 2004 World Editors Forum in Istanbul | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tabloids are the future for Mexican papers, says El Universal editor

"Tabloids are the Newspapers of the Future, " Raymundo Riva-Palacio (bio below), Editor for external affairs, El Universal, Mexico: "It is likely that the newspaper of the future in Mexico will be the tabloid," said Mr. Riva-Palacio, who provided an history of the Mexican newspaper market today at the 11th World Editors Forum to support his claim. "It is important to reach out to the new readers who have less and less time," he says. "Fast information that is different from radio and television is very important."

The Mexican press has been publishing tabloids for over a century. But the influence of the US press generated a strong notion in Mexico that only broadsheet papers carried serious content, a conception that lasted several decades. It was not until the 1990s that tabloids really made their way into Mexican journalistic culture, attacking the quality press market and challenging decision-makers.

Although they have not yet had time to prove their capacity to get in ahead of broadsheets on the quality press market, their commitment to present news from a different angle, covering issues aimed at more specific markets, shows this could be a medium-term strategy to compete in against the boom of digital media outlets by providing analysis and insight only the written press can offer.

Raymundo Riva-Palacio was born in the Federal District and spent the best part of his 31 years of journalistic experience as a correspondent abroad in Washington, D.C., Paris, Buenos Aires, Madrid and Central America. During the 1990s, he developed the expansion into the United States and Central American of the Agnecia de Estado Notimex. In the mid 1990s, he created supplements for the newspaper The Financier and developed a department for the investigation of taxes at Reforma.

In 1999, Riva-Palacio created and designed the newspaper Milenio and in 2003, he created and designed El Independiente. Both papers are based in Mexico City. For over a decade, he has taught journalism classes at the Universidad Iberoamericana. He has also written four books, two of them intented for students of journalism. He was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University and has written for American, Central American and Spanish newspapers. In his current position at El Universal, he coordiantes international and special projects.

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on June 1, 2004 at 03:53 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, s. 2004 World Editors Forum in Istanbul | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Editor of Poland's leading paper says tabloids are friendly, independent and explicit

It's a Fakt: Tabloid Leads Market in Poland,Grzegorz Jankowski (bio below), Editor, Fakt, Poland: Only two months after its launch, the Polish tabloid Fakt became the biggest newspaper in Poland. At the 11th World Editors Forum today, Mr. Jankowski provided the recipe for its success, and said Fakst represents a new era for tabloid-sized newspapers in Central and Eastern Europe.

"The 'picture newspapers' are expanding," he says. "In western countries, tabloids have existed for dozens of years, but in Poland and in other post-communist countries they appeared only a few years ago," he said.

Fakt, launched last October by Axel Springer, outsold Gazeta Wyborcza in December to become the country's top-selling newspaper. Fakt's daily circulation reached over 536,000, only two months after its October 22 launch, compared to 433,000 for Gazeta Wyborcza.

"Tabloid journalism" is appealing to the new European markets, said Mr. Jankowski. But the phrase, which has negative implications in many markets as being less serious-minded than other papers, has a very different meaning in today's "tabloid boom" environment.

"It is popular, quick, modern, based on pictures, it surprises readers with ideas, it informs explicitly about the topic, it describes events and social phenomena in a simple and clear way, it is independent and friendly towards readers and it helps them solve everyday problems," says Mr. Jankowski.

Grzegorz Jankowski has served as the Editor-in-Chief of Fakt Daily in Warsaw since the newspaper?s inception last October. Since then, Fakt has reached a circulation of over 536,000.

Previously, Jankowski was the Deputy Editor-in-Chief of Newsweek Magazine?s Polish edition from 2001 to 2002. From 1996 to 2001 he served as the editor of the foreign desk and the deputy chief editor of the home desk at Zycie Warszawy, a daily newspaper in Warsaw. He worked as a reporter for Polish radio?s channel 3 from 1990 to 1993.

Jankowski is married and has a six-year-old son. He was born in Warsaw in 1969.

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on June 1, 2004 at 03:34 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, s. 2004 World Editors Forum in Istanbul | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Offering both compact and broadsheet editions works for The Times of London

At the 11th World Editors Forum today, George Brock, Managing Editor of The Times of London (bio below), told the story of The Times' decision to offer a compact edition. In 2003 there were four quality broadsheets in the British market - The Daily Telegraph, The Times, The Guardian and The Independent Brock said. "The biggest single threat to broadsheets comes from the fact that readers have less time to read." This coupled with the fact that there is increased fragmentation of the media in Britain means that newspapers don't exert the dominance they used to. To date, newspapers had tried offering supplements and delivering directly to PDAs, thus unbundling the paper. However, given the extremely cramped quarters in which people were trying to read their papers while commuting, reader complaints about broadsheets increased.

"We are not pursuing the same strategy as the Independent, we are offering our readers a choice of broadsheet or compact edition," Brock explained. The Times has improved its position and is selling approximately 10% more in regions where they are offering both versions. Both versions will be offered in all markets as of June 15th and the paper expects a further increase in circulation.

Mr. Brock addressed an important question any paper considering a compact version: "Can you make it work financially?" Three quarters of The Times' revenues is from advertising and therefore the Times hopes to leverage the rise in circulation into an increase in advertising revenue, particularly as the new readers they have attracted - younger readers and women - tend to be highly sought after by advertisers. But so far their advertising revenues have remained stable.

"Because there is not one trend there is not one single format that will work. This is the beginning of a process. Format provides resilience for print in the face of competition from other media but we can't rely on it exclusively." Mr. Brock ended by admitting, "The arrival of compact versions has made attending such conferences a much cheerier event after the doom days of talking only about losing readers to the internet.|

George Brock, Managing Editor of The Times, United Kingdom

George Brock is Managing Editor of The Times. The Managing Editor?s duties include editorial strategy and planning, recruitment, resources and media regulation. Mr Brock was the launch editor of the compact edition of The Times.

Brock is 52 and was educated at Winchester College and Oxford University, where he read Modern History. He has worked on an evening paper in Yorkshire and from 1976-81 as a reporter on The Observer, specialising in race relations and Northern Ireland. He joined The Times in 1981 and has been a features writer and editor, Opinion Page editor, Foreign Editor (1987-1990), bureau chief in Brussels (1991-1995) and European Editor (1995-1997). He has contributed to newspapers across the world and broadcast frequently on the BBC.

Brock is a member of the board of the World Editors Forum (part of the World Association of Newspapers) and sits on the British committee of the International Press Institute. He is a governor of the Anglo-American Ditchley Foundation.

He is married and has two sons.

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on June 1, 2004 at 02:51 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, s. 2004 World Editors Forum in Istanbul | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Shaping the "compact revolution"

Harald Stanghelle , the political editor of Aftenposten, Norway, introduced today's morning session of the 11th World Editor's Forum by calling the shift from broadhseet to tabloid "the most exciting trend in the industry." Simon Kelner (bio below), Editor-in-Chief of the UK's The Independent newspaper www.independent.co.uk told the story of The Independent's shrink in size and corresponding swell in readership. Mr. Kelner was seeking a way to increase ciculation of Britain's fourth ranked broadsheet paper when he had an epiphany in a supermarket aisle - the inspiration none other than a row of toothpaste dispensers in a plethora of sizes. Looking at all the different size tubes and pumps, Mr. Kelner asked, "Why can't you do that with a paper? The newspaper is perhaps the only product whose shape and size is dictated by the producer not the consumer."

Market research revealed that readers were very attached to the values of broadsheet papers but not necessarily to their format. So the Independent decided to experiment by providing readers with a choice of format, launching the compact edition September 30, 2003. They opted for the term compact so as to avoid the negative connotations of the word "tabloid." Initially they targeted commuters and the compact version would go to press only after the final edition of the broadsheet version. However, very quickly the ciculation figures reflected great success.

The Independent has acheived its highest market share in 7 years. "Not only has there been an increase in the volume of readers but these are also the most desirable readers in terms of who the advertisers are targeting." thus Mr. Kelner ended his tale of the "very exciting journey" to compact format and predicted that the compact revolution "will change the shape of things forever."

Simon Kelner, Editor-in-Chief of The Independent, United Kingdom

Simon Kelner was appointed Editor-in-Chief of The Independent in May 1998 after a distinguished period as Editor of the Mail on Sunday's Night & Day magazine. It was not entirely new ground for him as he had worked previously for The Independent as Deputy Sports Editor and Sports Editor of The Independent on Sunday before coming Night Editor and finally Features Editor of The Independent in 1995. As Sports Editor of The Independent, he launched the first national stand-alone sports section.

From 1983 to 1986, Kelner served as Assistant Sports Editor of the Observer, where he was Sports Editor from 1990 to 1992 and Editor of the Observer magazine from 1991 to 1993. In 1992, the Observer magazine award won the Magazine of the Year award. Previously, Kelner was Sports Editor of the Kent Evening Post, a sports reporter at Extel and a trainee reporter at the Neath Guardian.

Kelner was the recipient of the "What the Papers Say" Editor of the Year award in 1999 and 2003, as well as an honorary fellowship from the University of Central Lancashire and the Edgar Wallace Award for the year 2000. He is the author of "To Jerusalem and Back."

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on June 1, 2004 at 01:12 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, s. 2004 World Editors Forum in Istanbul | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Saturday, May 29, 2004

The 11th World Editors Forum begins in Istanbul, Turkey

wansiteDear reader / blogger,
There have been fewer updates in the Editors Weblog during the past weeks - our apologies. However, there is a good reason: more than 1,200 editors and publishers are gathering and networking in the 11th World Editors Forum and the 57th WAN Congress (WAN is the World Association of Newspapers) from 30 May to 2 June 2004. We are now in Istanbul for four days and we are very excited to present a range of intelligent speakers to our members. Click HERE for the programme. And if you miss this conference, book the dates for the next year's conference in Seoul, Korea (29 May to 2 June 2005).
Regarding the Istanbul conference, a complete coverage will be done by our team: "live" evidently!

Source: World Editors Forum

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on May 29, 2004 at 10:20 PM in a. Is blogging journalism?, c. Converged or diverged? The multiplatform newsroom, e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, g. Visual strategies and photojournalism, i. What is newsworthy or how to reshape the future of the newspaper, k. Newspapers launches and results, l. Editors conferences, training sessions and awards, n. New sources for Editors, q. Global/Local trends, s. 2004 World Editors Forum in Istanbul | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

World press trends: advertising rebounds, circulation down slightly

Newspaper advertising revenues are finally on the upswing as the world economy rebounds, but global newspaper circulation is slightly down, according to the annual survey of World Press Trends published Monday by the World Association of Newspapers. The survey, presented to more than 1,300 publishers and editors from 88 countries at the 57th World Newspaper and 11th World Editors Forum in Istanbul, Turkey, showed that: - Global newspaper advertising revenue rose 2 percent in 2003 from a year earlier and is forecast to continue a steady increase through 2006. - Global newspaper circulation declined 0.12 percent in 2003 compared with a year earlier but was up 4.75 percent over the five-year period from 1999 to 2003. - The number of newspaper websites has doubled since 1999 and the global internet advertising market continues to grow steadily. - The number of free dailies is growing dramatically -- a 16 percent increase in 2003 from a year earlier and a 24 percent increase over the past five years in countries for which data was available.

"2003 was yet another year of great changes and challenges for newspapers," said Timothy Balding, Director General of WAN. "The pressures on the circulation of newspapers continued, but newspapers showed a greater willingness than ever before to innovate and experiment with strategies to win new readers.

"Many newspapers worldwide changed their formats to satisfy reader demand and many others are still studying the opportunities that exist in compact formats," he said. "Many more newspapers converted to full colour, with benefits both for advertising and editorial. There is evidence that newspaper internet operations are capturing new audiences. And the growth in new free commuter dailies is also expanding the reach of the written press to a younger generation."

The survey, which WAN has published annually since 1987, this year includes data on all countries where newspapers are published -- 208 in all -- an increase from 74 countries last year. In addition to providing a broader picture of the world newspaper market, the increase provides a wealth of unusual and interesting facts about newspapers from around the world, such as:

- Though literacy in Afghanistan is only 20 percent, an estimated 265 newspapers were published in 2002, with 150 distributed in the capital, Kabul.
- Only about 8 percent of Paraguayans believe that the press is trustworthy. This public cynicism, combined with a recession, has drastically reduced circulation at most daily papers.
- In Senegal, one newspaper costs the same as one kilo of rice. Sixty percent of readers borrow the newspaper rather than purchase one.

The 2004 World Press Trends survey reveals:

1 - On circulation
- Newspaper circulations were up in 35 percent of the countries surveyed year-on-year in 2003, and up in 28 percent of the countries from 1999-2003.
Some developing markets showed strong circulation gains, while many mature markets saw sales decline.
- In the 15 countries of the "old" European Union, 13 reported circulation losses in 2003 compared to 2002 and in the five years from 1999. Circulation in the 15 was down 2.2 percent year-on-year and 5.9 percent over the five years period, representing a loss of 1,415,000 daily sales in one year and 4,507,000 daily sales over five years.

The two countries in this group which showed growth in 2003 were Belgium (+0.2 percent) and Spain (+0.1 percent). Those reporting losses were: Austria -1.2 percent; Denmark -3.7 percent; Finland -1.7 percent; France -1.51 percent; Germany -3.0 percent; Greece -1.0 percent; Ireland -7.8 percent; Italy -1.7 percent; Luxembourg -2.4 percent; Netherlands -2.5 percent; Portugal -4.03 percent; Sweden -0.1 percent; and the United Kingdom -4.7 percent.

Over the five years 1999-2003, circulation declined in: Austria -12.9 percent; Belgium -5.5 percent; Denmark -9.6 percent; Finland -2.7 percent; France -4.98 percent; Germany -8.1 percent; Greece -8.0 percent; Ireland -3.8 percent; Luxembourg -7.12 percent; Netherlands -6.2 percent; Portugal -16.76 percent; Sweden -1.3 percent; and the United Kingdom -3.4 percent.

Two countries increased circulation over the five-year period: Italy (+0.1 percent) and Spain (+0.6 percent).

- In the countries which entered the EU in 2004, total circulation fell -2.3 percent in 2003 compared to 2002. In the five year period from 1999, circulation was down -2.8 percent.

- Elsewhere in Europe, Iceland saw a drop in circulation of -7.79 in 2003 and -23.08 percent over five years, Norway recorded a drop of -2.9 percent year-on-year and -6.4 percent over five years, Switzerland saw a decrease of -2.1 percent in the year and -6.2 percent over five years, and Turkey saw a decline of -23.2 percent in the year and -42.7 percent over five years.

- The circulation of US dailies remained almost stable in 2003, according to preliminary data provided by the Newspaper Association of America, and was down -1.42 percent over five years.

- In Japan, newspaper sales fell -0.67 percent in 2003, and sales have decreased by -2.60 percent over the past five years.

- Circulation in China was up +4.17 percent year-on-year and +35.69 percent over the five-year period. China also has the largest total daily circulation of any country in the world with more than 85 million copies sold, followed by India (more than 72 million copies), Japan (70,339,000 copies), and the United States (55,185,000 copies).

- In Russia, the number of daily titles is growing rapidly: from 222 in 2001 to 428 in 2003, or nearly double in two years.

-In Latin America, where it has been difficult to obtain reliable data, the Brazilian newspaper market declined -10.7 percent in terms of sales in 2003 and was down -7.2 percent over the last five years; Costa Rica reported circulation losses of -3.1 percent in 2003 and -2.4 percent over the last five years; while Uruguay suffered a -26.6 percent drop in sales in 2003.

-Indian newspaper sales increased +9.16 percent in 2003 and were up +23.21 percent over five years. Singapore's newspaper sales declined -0.5 percent in 2002 (the latest figure available) and were down -0.6 percent over five years. Malaysia newspaper sales increased +4.1 percent in 2002 and were up +9.7 percent over five years.

- Australia recorded a decline of -0.79 percent in sales in 2003 and -4.4 percent over five years, while New Zealand newspaper sales were down -0.8 percent year-on-year and -5.3 percent over five years.

-The Norwegians and the Japanese remain the world's greatest newspaper buyers with, respectively, 684 and 646.9 sales per thousand population each day. Sweden comes next with 590 followed by Finland with 524.2.

- Japan is home to 20 of the world's top 100 largest newspapers in circulation terms. The United States is next with 18, followed by China and India at 16 each.


2 - Readership

- Global circulation figures indicate that the figure for world-wide newspaper readership is well over one billion.

3 - Advertising

North America is the world's largest advertising market for daily
newspapers, with 57 percent of the world's advertising share for dailies, followed by Europe with 23 percent, the Asia-Pacific region with 16 percent and the rest of the world with four percent.

In the "old" European Union, newspaper advertising revenues were up +2 percent in 2003 and +4.5 percent over five years. Nine of the 13 countries for which figures were available in 2003 recorded increases in advertising revenue: Austria (+1.9 percent); Belgium (+16.7 percent); Denmark (+4.2 percent); Finland (+1.9 percent); Germany (+2.8 percent); Greece (+54.3 percent); Luxembourg (+4.6); Netherlands (+14.2 percent); and the United Kingdom (0.7 percent).

Advertising revenues decreased in France (-3.6 percent), Italy (-0.5 percent), and Spain (-27.5 percent). Advertising revenues did not change year-on-year in Sweden.

Over the past five years, advertising revenues were up in eight of the 13 EU countries for which figures were available: Austria (+0.8 percent); Belgium (+22.6 percent); Denmark (+12.8 percent); Greece (+32.7 percent); Italy (+7.1 percent); Luxembourg (+25.2 percent); Netherlands (+6.9 percent); and the United Kingdom (7.3 percent).

In the countries which entered the EU in 2004, advertising revenues increased +11.4 percent in 2003 and rose in six of the seven for which figures were available. Advertising increases were recorded in Poland (+44.7 percent); Czech Republic (+6.1 percent); Slovakia (+23.1 percent); Hungary (+11.3 percent); Estonia (+12.5 percent); and Latvia ((+5.2 percent). Revenues remained stable in Lithuania.

Over the five years, advertising revenues were up +24.6 percent in the region and rose, sometimes spectacularly so, in six of the countries: Poland (+102.9 percent); Czech Republic (+51.9 percent); Slovakia (+69.8 percent); Hungary (+42.5 percent); Estonia (+25.4 percent); and Latvia (+24.9 percent). Advertising revenues were down in Lithuania by -11.1 percent in the same period.

- In the United States, newspaper advertising revenues grew +1.9 percent in 2003 compared to a year earlier, but were down -2.9 percent over the past five years. In Japan, the figures were down -1.0 percent and - 8.5 percent respectively.

- Advertising revenues in China increased +11.7 percent year-on-year in 2003 and +87.0 percent over five years.

- In Russia, advertising revenue grew +17 percent in 2003.

- In Latin America, advertising revenues rose +4.5 percent in Brazil year-on-year and +11.4 percent over five years . In Chile, advertising revenues were up +5.2 percent in 2003 but were down -10 percent over five years. Advertising revenues in Uruguay rose +16.5 percent last year.

- Advertising revenues fell -6.2 percent in Turkey over one year and -26.15 percent over five, in constant terms.

- Although newspaper advertising revenues are increasing in many markets, newspaper's share of the world ad market declined from 31.2 percent in 2002 to 30.8 percent in 2003. But newspapers remain the world's second largest advertising medium, after television, which took 38.8 percent of world advertising expenditure in 2003.

Sixteen countries saw newspaper advertising market share growth in 2003: Argentina, Belgium, Chile, Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Hong Kong, Iceland, Ireland, Malaysia, Netherlands, Peru, Poland, Romania, Serbia-Montenegro, and South Africa.

Over five years, newspapers in 16 countries increased market share: Argentina, China, Hong Kong, Iceland, Indonesia, Ireland, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Burma, Pakistan, Romania, Russia, Serbia-Montenegro, United Arab Emirates, and the United Kingdom.

4 - Internet

- The growth of the number of on-line editions has slowed since 2001, but is more than double the number in 1999.

- Internet advertising revenues topped 10 billion US dollars in 2003, and are forecast to grow to more than 13 billion by 2006. The growth has been steady from 1999, when it stood at over five billion dollars.

In the United States and Canada, internet advertising revenues increased 7 percent from 2002 to 2003, while in the Asia-Pacific region, internet advertising revenues grew 11 percent in the year. European internet ad revenues grew 5.9 percent.

- A WAN study of internet classified advertising shows a gap between expectations about internet advertising and reality. Publishers questioned in the study said that jobs ads would be the first to migrate from print to internet, when in fact automobile ads are now, on average, providing the greatest percentage of online classified revenues.

5 - Free Newspapers

Free newspaper advertising revenues have increased 1.5 percent over one year and 22.6 percent over five.

- In some markets, free dailies have been growing distribution; in the United Kingdom, free newspaper distribution grew from 237,000 copies in 1999 to 864,000 copies in 2003.
- Metro International, the Swedish-based publisher of free commuter dailies, is publishing 5.5 million daily copies in 16 countries.

The World Press Trends 2004 edition is now available at the World Association of Newspapers website or by contacting WAN, 7 rue Geoffroy Saint Hilaire, 75005 Paris France. Tel: +33 1 47 42 85 00, Fax +33 1 47 42 49 48. E-mail: [email protected]

Source: World Association of Newspapers

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on May 29, 2004 at 03:01 PM in b. Alliances and partnerships: consequences for newsrooms, d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, i. What is newsworthy or how to reshape the future of the newspaper, q. Global/Local trends, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, May 25, 2004

Free dailies turn profits and expand: Metro International answers its editorial critics with a new Internet ad

I've only been in Paris for a week, but I can attest to the fact that the new, free, tabloid-format dailies distributed in metro stations are as ubiquitous here as they are in New York (my home town). In both cities, one need only to hop onto the subway during the morning rush hour to witness how quickly this relatively new phenomenon has caught on among commuters who don't leave home with a big-name paper already tucked under their arm. In fact, Le Monde reported last week that according to Pierre-Jean Bozo, president of free daily publisher 20 Minutes France, 76% of 20 Minute's readers did not previously read a daily paper. The article reported that although the Parisian free dailies had major losses in 2003, they are currently experiencing their first real wave of profitability, allowing them to expand into the provinces. All in all, it is estimated that one in five French people read a free daily newspaper regularly. And now, free daily publisher Metro International is answering its critics on the editorial side with a new Internet advertisement...

Free dailies have been renowned for their 24-page brevity - but critics allege that's just a nice way of saying coverage isn't complete or challenging. The new ad fights back, portraying Metro papers as simultaneously youthful and serious. In several flashing panels, we learn that Metro International employs 400 journalists around the globe (sounds like a direct response to complaints that too many of its articles are culled from wire services) and that unlike traditional dailies, Metro papers boast real results in attracting the young adult readers so prized by advertisers.

The message? That Metro papers do real journalism, and even if they do cut some corners, you can't complain, because they are delivering on readership. It will be interesting to see if and how regional and national papers will compete for the free dailies' growing readership - without adopting the "news-lite" style that has garnered little respect from more traditional editorial communities.

Source: Le Monde and also see this older article from Slate on the French editorial community's reaction to free dailies

Posted by Dana Goldstein on May 25, 2004 at 08:31 AM in d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, i. What is newsworthy or how to reshape the future of the newspaper, k. Newspapers launches and results, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, May 18, 2004

UK: The Independent shrinks its format and its ad revenues

Read in MediaWeek this apparent contradiction: "In the first four months of 2004, The Independent’s ad volumes fell by 11% compared to the previous year. During the same period the overall quality market, including Sunday titles, was down 1.8% in volume terms, according to Nielsen Media Research." But for sales, the opposite occured. "Extra “value” comes from The Independent’s increased readership and circulation. Sales in April were up 15% year on year and readership is up 31% for the six months to the end of March" said MediaWeek. "While newspaper bosses may argue that the smaller size gives more impact to an ad, media agencies remain unconvinced. “An ad may look bigger on a compact page but there will be less editorial on that page, which means a reader will spend less time looking at it,” one press director says.

Source: MediaWeek

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on May 18, 2004 at 12:39 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Thursday, May 13, 2004

UK: last ever broadsheet Indy to be published Friday

The Independent has ended months of speculation and abandoned its broadsheet format in favour of a tabloid edition. The move, which sees the end of the broadsheet edition of the newspaper in the UK after almost two decades, will come as no surprise to the industry. A leader column on page 2 of today’s edition said: “Since 30 September last year, we have been offering readers a choice between broadsheet and compact formats." Describing the response as “overwhelming”, the paper said the number of readers that prefer the broadsheet is now “so mall that it simply does not make business sense to continue to publish it”

Source: Mediaweek

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on May 13, 2004 at 04:14 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, k. Newspapers launches and results | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, May 12, 2004

British Independent reaches the stars

indy_campaign_150

Thanks to Mediaweek for this exclusive news about the British press: "According to the latest National Readership Survey figures for October last year to March 2004, the paper has seen a massive increase of 31% in the number of readers. Full details of readership levels will be released by the NRS next week, but the Indy’s fellow tabloid convert, The Times, has also seen a fall of 17% over the same period, according the figures released this week. The figures are all the more impressive, and a justification to Indy bosses, as the total newspaper market has fallen by 10% for the six-month period. Detailed areas in the latest figures also revealed the Indy’s 40% increase in readers aged between 15 and 44 years old, an area the paper claims in highly significant for the advertisers."

Source: Mediaweek

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on May 12, 2004 at 05:39 AM in d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Switzerland: 75% Blick readers prefer the tabloid format

Launched last week, the tabloid edition of Blick, the largest daily newspaper in Switzerland (popular daily with circulation of around 300,000 copies a day) was chosen by three buyers of four, even if they had the possibility to buy the bigger format in kiosks (at the same price). The final decision to give up the "historical format" will be taken in the coming weeks, but Michael Ringier, Ringier CEO, told "the figures were quite clear..." Blick's circulation has declined in 2003 and the group expects a rebound. One remark was particularly interesting: to answer the free press challenge, Ringier said traditional press had to make the difference with "real things" like quality of the paper or elements who give a reason to the readers to pay for.

Source: Ringier group press conference

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on May 12, 2004 at 04:15 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, k. Newspapers launches and results | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, May 11, 2004

What should newspapers do to attract younger readers?

Henry Scott, managing director of the free paper Metro New York (and ex-NYT), which is targeted at 18 to 34 year olds, has given a - short but strong - interview to I want Media. He said that "to attract young readers, newspapers must understand this formula: Time + Money – Relevance = Lost Reader. Newspapers must offer quick reads for time-pressed young people, and they must tailor their content for relevance -- which doesn't mean 'dumbing down,' but does mean acknowledging that young readers have different interests than their parents. And finally, newspapers must adopt differential pricing, where the readers they most want get a paper for free, while their parents pay full freight." And all my apologizes to Patrick Philips for having mislinked this posting today morning.

Source: I want Media.

Read also the comment made by Jeff Jarvis in its buzzmachine. And see Metro New York website. The newspaper was launched last week in New York. It's the 39th edition of Metro since its first launching in Stockholm, Sweden, in 1995.

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on May 11, 2004 at 03:27 AM in d. Making newspapers easier to read , e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, k. Newspapers launches and results | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Thursday, May 06, 2004

UK: The Independent named Daily Newspaper of the Year

The Independent broadsheet newspaper in the UK was yesterday named Daily Newspaper of the Year at the London Press Club Awards, writes Ian Burrell, Media Editor at The Independent. Andrew Marr, the political editor of the BBC and a former editor of The Independent, read out a citation from the judges which said "the sheer courage of becoming the first broadsheet to 'go tabloid' was never going to be enough to win a title of Daily Newspaper of the Year. The fact that The Independent did it first did indeed show bravery, but it is the way they did it and the impact that it has had that won them the accolade." It has been a very successful year for The Independent as the newspaper has already been named National Newspaper of the Year at the British Press Awards in March and Simon Kelner, the editor-in-chief of the newspaper, was named Editor of the Year at the What The Papers Say Awards in December.

Source: The Independent

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on May 6, 2004 at 02:32 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, l. Editors conferences, training sessions and awards, m. From editorial quality to editorial measurement | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, May 04, 2004

UK: The Independent expected to phase out broadsheet format/Times expected to keep dual formats

According to Claire Cozens at The Guardian "The Independent is hoping to axe its broadsheet edition by the end of next month after regional trials of selling only the tabloid edition proved a success." There is a different attitude at the Times newspaper, Owen Gibson at The Guardian writes that the newspaper wants to keep both a tabloid and broadsheet sized version. According to the article "Times editor Robert Thomson insisted today there was "no reason" why the newspaper could not go on producing dual broadsheet and tabloid editions indefinitely. Owen Gibson writes "while the tabloid Independent has been an unqualified success, reviving the paper's moribund circulation, the case for the cut-down version of the Times is less clear cut. Fewer of its readers have switched to the smaller size and while its decline in circulation has been halted, the rise has been nowhere near as dramatic as its rival."

Source: The Guardian (article by Claire Cozens) The Guardian (article by Owen Gibson)

Posted by Ruth Bayliss on May 4, 2004 at 03:39 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, April 27, 2004

Swiss Daily Blick to trial tabloid version

It seems the focus on introducing tabloid versions of newspapers is continuing throughout the world. According to Publicitas Swizz daily newspaper Blick is to trial a tabloid version, which will launch on May 3. The motto of the test is "Two Formats - same content" according to the article. The launch makes Blick the first daily newspaper in Switzerland to have two formats. The tabloid size will be published as a "single section" and attached to the broadsheet version with the trial lasting for several weeks, accompanied by market research. Subscribers will continue to receive the larger format, but will also receive vouchers they can exchange for the compact size at a newsstand. At the end of the trial a decision will be made as to which size is most effective.

Source: Publicitas

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on April 27, 2004 at 02:38 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, April 21, 2004

Are the days of the broadsheet numbered?

“With The Independent’s recent switch to a compact newspaper, the merits of the broadsheet have come under closer scrutiny than ever” writes Mediaweek. In this interesting article two professional consumers argue for and against the introduction of the tabloid format and question what the future holds for the broadsheet and its tabloid version. Olivia Hawthorn, an account manager at Total Media believes that “the biggest concern is whether the tabloid undermines the broadsheet status of quality.” She supports the introduction of the tabloid version and argues that the introduction of a tabloid format “is no sign of dumbing down.” We have to ask at this stage what the future holds for the broadsheet amongst this continuing focus on smaller size publications. It is worth reading this article to investigate how the public perceive the introduction of tabloid versions and the extent of their loyalty towards the traditional broadsheet.

Source: Mediaweek

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on April 21, 2004 at 05:37 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Germany: Axel Springer tests new national daily in compact size

According to Publicitas “The German publisher Axel Springer is testing a new quality daily newspaper in compact size. Welt Kompakt will start on 24th May, 2004 during 8 weeks in Düsseldorf and in the area. It will be published from Monday to Friday for a copy price of 0.50 Euro. The title will be based on the editorial offer of the daily newspaper die Welt but it will have a specific approach designed for the tabloid size.” It seems the switch to tabloid in the UK has encouraged other countries to follow suit, it is fair to question at this stage whether audiences in every country will appreciate this change?

Source: Publicitas

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on April 21, 2004 at 05:31 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, k. Newspapers launches and results | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Friday, March 26, 2004

UK: The Independent may end big-page format earlier than expected

The compact now accounts for 74 per cent of sales of the British Independent after the launching of the tabloid edition end of September 2003. "The proportion is going up all the time. If you get to 90 per cent (for the compact), it doesn‚t make sense to produce both... The success of the compact prompts us to take a decision sooner rather than later, but we will review the situation" Mr Fallon - who runs the UK businesses of Independent News & Media - said.

Source: Times online.

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on March 26, 2004 at 01:30 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, p. Quotation of the day | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Thursday, March 25, 2004

Metro to be launched in New York in May

Metro International, the Swedish company whose 34 papers include freebies in Philly and Boston, is building a staff to launch Metro New York sometime after May 1. Stefano Hatfield, who wrote for Advertising Age and was Ad Age Global's editorial director, is editor of the new tabloid. The publisher is Henry Scott, who worked in new media at The New York Times and also was president of Out magazine. Metro had delayed its New York launch last year, when the freebie amNew-York debuted with backing from Tribune Co., the publisher of Newsday.AmNewYork ended 2003 with daily circulation of 179,000, mainly in Manhattan.

Source : New York Daily News and Paul Colford.

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on March 25, 2004 at 01:14 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, k. Newspapers launches and results | Permalink | TrackBack

Friday, March 19, 2004

Trend to tabloid-sized papers in Switzerland?

Received few days ago from Martin Hitz, editor of Medienspiegel, a pertinent Swiss blog: "Swiss media managers seem to attribute the success of the free daily 20 Minuten largely to the tabloid format of the paper. How else to explain the growing trend to experiment with that size? The Blick, the only real Swiss "Tabloid" (albeit currently not apperaring in that format), is reportedly planning to run a test with the handy size later this year. Starting in May, the Aargauer Zeitung will shrink the local section of the paper to the smaller dimension. The regional paper Basler Zeitung is pondering over the format. And to the editor-in-chief of the Tages Anzeiger, Switzerland's second largest newspaper (after Blick), a shift to the tabloid format is "immaginable" for certain supplements. The newspaper Le Matin from the French-speaking part of Switzerland has switched to the trendy size already 3 years ago.

More information on Medienspiegel.

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on March 19, 2004 at 08:17 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, q. Global/Local trends | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

UK: Metro outruns modest ad upturn

According to Chris Tryhorn, "display advertising revenues at freesheet Metro have rocketed by 29% in the five months to the end of last month, according to the paper's owners, the Daily Mail & General Trust. Metro, which celebrated its fifth anniversary this week in England, has become a huge success with commuters: its circulation has risen by 7% year on year to a new record of 894,000."

Source: Media Guardian.

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on March 19, 2004 at 03:35 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Thursday, March 18, 2004

UK: The Independent goes tabloid-only for a day

The UK daily Independent is to force the 30 per cent of those who haven't yet taken up the tabloid version to try it out after deciding to go exclusively compact for a day. It will print Thursday's paper(18 March 2004) in tabloid form only, giving all readers a taste of the size it introduced six months ago. The Independent is likely to switch to tabloid-only eventually because of the costs of printing in two sizes, but needs to ease broadsheet readers into the new size. More than two-thirds of readers now buy the tabloid, which has helped the Independent build circulation to 256,378 last month, a 15 per cent increase year on year.

Source: Media Guardian and EJC newsletter.

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on March 18, 2004 at 07:12 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Wednesday, March 17, 2004

British Press Awards: The Independent, newspaper of the year

The full list of the Britis Press Awards is available on MediaGuardian (registration required). A very balanced result between the different British quality newspapers.

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on March 17, 2004 at 02:42 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, f. Weekly supplements, g. Visual strategies and photojournalism | Permalink | TrackBack

Tuesday, March 16, 2004

How Metro has recognised the importance of the commuting audience

In a long and very positive article on Metro and the free press concept, the UK magazine MediaWeek, I pick up this formula: “Metro is looking a little tired... There have been a few cosmetic changes in recent times, but it could use a wash and brush up, giving it some cleaner lines, sharper headlines and – wouldn’t this be nice – less clutter: compare it to the compact Indy and Times and it looks a little last century” says Mark Gallagher, head of press at Manning Gottlieb OMD. But the free-newspaper concept can’t be too exhausted if Richard Desmond plans to launch a similar product in the London evening market, a move which some agency figures often appear to yearn for at times.

Free dailies are now being read by 19% of the urban population in 11 European countries ? an increase from virtually nothing 10 years ago to the present figure of 12 million readers. This equates to 24 million readers a week and a reach of 38%, according to Metro International?s annual readership survey with TNS Gallup.

Source: MediaWeek and Ifra newsletter.

See also in MediaWeek: Freesheets win new readership.

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on March 16, 2004 at 02:25 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, h. New readers: how to involve them, i. What is newsworthy or how to reshape the future of the newspaper, r. What new revenues and new business models? | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Thursday, March 11, 2004

Denver billionaire sets out to resuscitate San Francisco Examiner

The San Francisco Examiner, once a prosperous newspaper under the power-hungry reign of magnate William Randolph Hearst, is setting out to end decades of decay after being bought by billionaire Phil Anschutz, another empire builder with an enormous appetite for success. The 124-year-old San Francisco paper is unveiling a new look and expanded news coverage this week, marking the first significant changes since Anschutz completed a $20 million deal that included a printing plant and another paper published three days a week. The makeover represents the latest attempt to save the Examiner, now a free tabloid.

Source: Ifra newsletter and the Miami Herald.

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on March 11, 2004 at 01:20 PM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet, k. Newspapers launches and results | Permalink | TrackBack

Tuesday, March 09, 2004

Europe: two more compact size newspapers

Since March 6, The Scotsman, Scotland’s leading quality newspaper for more than 187 years, offers a Saturday compact edition to its readers. The Scotsman Publications Ltd says that the compact Saturday Scotsman will remain committed to quality journalism and the newspaper will continue to be produced in its traditional broadsheet form from Monday to Friday.

In Belgium, the regional newspaper of Antwerp, Gazet van Antwerpen (GVA) has been published in compact size since March 1st, 2004. GVA was published in two formats (a smaller section within the large one) since January 21st, 2004. After positive comments from readers, the publisher of GVA, Concentra, decided to publish the entire newspaper in the new size.

Source: Publicitas newsletter.

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on March 9, 2004 at 03:26 PM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink | TrackBack

Wednesday, February 18, 2004

UK: arrival of compacts poses big questions for The Guardian

Thanks to George Brock, managing editor of The Times who gave us the authorization to post excerpts of this article: "The question that now obsesses journalists is when, and if, The Daily Telegraph and The Guardian will follow the lead of The Independent and The Times. The January sales figures will show that the two broadsheets seem to be suffering from the impact of the two compacts."

Excerpts of the article:

"According to industry sources, Telegraph sales are expected to have fallen to about 915,000, their lowest level for 60 years, while sales of The Guardian have dropped to a 24 year low of about 384,000 and are down by about 6 per cent year on year.

Meanwhile, since the launch of its compact on September 30, The Independent has achieved sales increases of 40 per cent in the areas where it has been on sale. Its January circulation will be up by 12 per cent, year on year, at 248,900. On Saturdays, when there are no commuters wanting a convenient compact, The Independent has nevertheless bitten the bullet and ditched the broadsheet and now sells nationwide as a compact. On the first two Saturdays, sales rose by more than 40,000 to 220,000. Encouraged by the success of the British flagship, the Irish Independent launched a compact this week...

With sales up by about 30,000 on December and at their highest for 11 months, The Times is also encouraged by the progress of its compact. It is now on sale in the Carlton, Meridian, Granada, Central and Anglia television regions, and about 110,000 compacts are being sold every day.

Both The Daily Telegraph and The Guardian are inhibited in their ability to respond -the former by uncertainties about who is to be its new owner and the latter by the doubts of Alan Rusbridger, its Editor, about the wisdom of going compact. Both have tabloids ready to go.

For those who have seen The Guardian as the most innovative of the broadsheets - it was the first to introduce a tabloid section, which has been imitated by all the others, and the first really to push a newspaper website -the main surprise has been that The Guardian was not the first broadsheet to offer a compact edition. So what is going on in Rusbridger's mind?

... On the principle of "if it ain''t broken, don't fix it", he may wonder whether ''compact" broadsheets represent a permanent or only a temporary shift in the format of the serious newspapers.

... Another big question is whether the under-40s buying ''newspapers'' in 2020 will prefer to read, or get, their papers online, rather than in any newsprint format. None of us can answer that question, but which will prove to be the better long-term investment? Will going compact damage The Guardian's cleverly created brand as the serious paper of the Left? Would its future be better guarded by being the only mainstream serious broadsheet?

... Consultation is integral to The Guardian's culture, and a decision of such a historic nature cannot be made without consulting the staff. A recent poll of Guardian journalists went against going compact.
However, The Guardian needs to respond in some way to the dent in its sales caused by the two compacts.

Editors of The Guardian do long stints and Rusbridger is only the third in the past 48 years. Rusbridger's most significant contribution to the paper's history so far has been the development of Guardian Unlimited as the most successful newspaper website. The decision he has to make is not so easy as it may seem and he won't be thanked by his staff or his readers if he gets it wrong. It is a heavy responsibility."

The whole story on The Times website (only for subscribers).

Weblog's editor note: The Guardian has already taken the decision not to go tabloid (see former posting in the "tabloid vs broadsheet" category.

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on February 18, 2004 at 02:39 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink

Monday, February 16, 2004

UK: Guardian to stay broadsheet

 "The Guardian has ruled out launching a tabloid edition for editorial and economic reasons" says Lisa O'Carroll in MediaGuardian. Alan Rusbridger, the editor, told staff that the decision has been taken not to follow the Independent and the Times who launched twin versions late last year.

Excerpts of the article:

"The tabloid Independent and Times have shown that the format change can lead to a different type of journalism. Our key priority is to maintain the integrity of the Guardian's journalism, and we believe that will be achieved in the long-term through sustained editorial investment and remaining distinctive in an ever-converging newspaper market," said Alan Rusbridger, the Guardian 's editor...

... He also felt the economic risks were huge - it is estimated that the Times will spend £12m to £15m in its first year producing and marketing twin editions...

... Overall circulation of the Independent climbed 4.65% month on month in January. It is now selling 248,876, with a sizeable chunk of households - 35% - buying the tabloid edition...

... The Times's circulation grew 3.83% month on month to 660,713, although it fell 7.02% in the six months to January, unlike the Independent which saw a 4.6% rise in the equivalent period...

... Circulation of the Guardian, including giveaways and discounted copies, was up 2.16% month on month to 383,157, but down 3.84% in the six months to January, while the Telegraph was up only 0.35% month on month to 914,981 and down 5.36% half yearly...

... But ultimately both publishers will "switch off" the broadsheet edition because it is too expensive to run both. Circulation may also be affected by the inevitable reduction in the amount of money newsagents are paid to stock the tabloid edition.

The whole story on MediaGuardian.

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on February 16, 2004 at 02:08 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink

Friday, February 13, 2004

Belgium: Der Standard change to tabloid

On March 8, 2004, the Belgian quality newspaper Der Standard will change its format from broadsheet to tabloid. Next on the list: maybe Aftenposten in Norway! Harald Stanghelle, the newspaper's political editor, told me the final decision was expected by the end of March.
Source (in German): newsroom.at

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on February 13, 2004 at 02:23 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink

Monday, February 09, 2004

Irish broadsheet to go tabloid

The Irish Independent is to go tabloid following the sales success of its British counterpart, it was announced today. A compact edition of the daily broadsheet will be launched in Dublin mid-February in a move heralded as an important development for the Irish newspaper industry.

The whole story on the Scotsman.com News.

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on February 9, 2004 at 03:02 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink

Tuesday, February 03, 2004

United Kingdom: The Independent publishes its Saturday edition in a compact format

The broadsheet Saturday edition of The Independent has been abandoned in favour of a compact format from January 31.
To the UK newspaper, "the new five-section compact will comprise all the regular features of the Saturday Independent in a modern, convenient format plus new columns, more sport, an expanded personal finance section and a brand new travel magazine".

Posted by Bertrand Pecquerie on February 3, 2004 at 01:33 AM in e. Tabloid vs. broadsheet | Permalink