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Thursday, July 29, 2004

U.S: Deep Throat suspect dead

Media Guardian reports that Watergate Deep Throat suspect Fred LaRue was found dead in a Mississippi motel room today. Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, who based much of their investigative reporting about the Nixon White House on information from an insider they called Deep Throat, have said they would reveal their source's identity only after his death. "Although there have been several names advanced as Deep Throat, LaRue is one of the more likely candidates," the Guardian reports. "He was a special assistant to John Mitchell, the former attorney general who headed Creep, the Campaign to Re-elect the President, in 1972. ... Although LaRue insisted he was not Deep Throat, and that the source was a combination of several people, Woodward and Bernstein have insisted Deep Throat was one person. LaRue said last year that President Nixon had not been told of the plan to break into the building. ... LaRue served four and a half months in prison for his role in the Watergate conspiracy, after being charged with obstructing justice." This summer marks the 30th anniversary of the Watergate scandal. Check out this excellent look back at journalism's impact on Nixon's resignation and Watergate's long-term impact on American journalism, from the American Journalism Review.

Source: Media Guardian and American Journalism Review

Posted by Dana Goldstein on July 29, 2004 at 10:44 AM in i. Future of print, o. Ethics and Press Freedom | Permalink

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